Your Cloud Installed Before Lunch with QuickStart Cloud Installer 1.0

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Figure 1. Inside QuickStart Cloud Installer.

What if I told you that you can have your Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) based Cloud infrastructure, with Red Hat Virtualization, OpenStack, OpenShift and CloudForms all setup before you have to stop for lunch?

Would you be surprised?

Could you do that today?

In most cases I am betting your answer would be not possible, not even on your best day. Not to worry, the solution is here and it’s called the QuickStart Cloud Installer (QCI).

Today Red Hat announced the general availability of

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PCI Series: Requirement 3 – Protect Stored Cardholder Data

Welcome to another post dedicated to the use of Identity Management (IdM) and related technologies in addressing the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS). This specific post is related to requirement three (i.e. the requirement to protect stored cardholder data). In case you’re new to the series – the outline and mapping of individual articles to the requirements can be found in the overarching post that started the series.

Section three of the PCI DSS standard talks about storing cardholder data in a secure way. One of the technologies that can be used for secure storage of cardholder data is

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PCI Series: Requirement 2 – Do Not Use Vendor-Supplied Defaults for System Passwords and Other Security Parameters

This article is third in a series dedicated to the use of Identity Management (IdM) and related technologies to address the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS). This specific post covers the PCI DSS requirement related to not using vendor-supplied defaults for system passwords and other security parameters. The outline and mapping of individual articles to the requirements can be found in the overarching post that started the series.

The second section of the PCI-DSS standard applies to defaults – especially passwords and other security parameters. The standard calls for the reset of passwords (etc.) for any new system before placing it on the network. IdM can help here. Leveraging IdM for centralized accounts and policy information allows for a simple automated provisioning of new systems with

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In Defense of the Pet Container, Part 3: Puppies, Kittens and… Containers

In our third and final installment (see: part one & part two), let’s take a look at some high-level use cases for Linux containers as well as finally (finally) defending what I like to call “pet” containers. From a general perspective, we see three repeated high-level use cases for containerizing applications:

  1. The fully orchestrated, multi-container application as you would create in OpenShift via the Red Hat Container Development Kit;
  2. Loosely orchestrated containers that don’t use advanced features like application templates and Kubernetes; and
  3. Pet containers.

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PCI Series: Requirement 1 – Install and Maintain a Firewall Configuration to Protect Cardholder Data

This article is one of the blog posts dedicated to use of Identity Management (IdM) and related technologies to address the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS). This specific post is related to requirement one – install and maintain a firewall configuration to protect cardholder data. The outline and mapping of individual articles to the requirements can be found in the overarching post that started the series.

The first requirement of the PCI standard talks about the firewalls and networking. While Red Hat’s Identity Management solution is not directly related to setting up networks and firewall rules, there are several aspects of IdM that

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Identity Management and Related Technologies and their Applicability to PCI DSS

The Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) is not new. It has existed for several years and provides security guidelines and best practices for the storage and processing of personal cardholder data. This article takes a look at PCI DSS 3.2 (published in April of 2016) and shows how Identity Management in Red Hat Enterprise Linux (IdM) and related technologies can help customers to address PCI DSS requirements to achieve and stay compliant with the standard. If you need a copy of the PCI DSS document it can be acquired from the document library at the following site: www.pcisecuritystandards.org

In October of 2015 Red Hat published a paper that gives an overview of the PCI DSS standard and shows how Red Hat Satellite and other parts of the Red Hat portfolio can help customers to address their PCI compliance challenges. In this post I would like to expand on this paper and drill down into more detail about

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Announcing Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host 7.2.6

Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host is a small footprint, purpose-built version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux that is designed to run containerized workloads. Building on the success of our last release, Red Hat’s Atomic-OpenShift team is excited to announce the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host 7.2.6. This release features improvements in rpm-ostree, cockpit, skopeo, docker, and the atomic CLI. The full release notes can be found here. This post is going to explore a major new feature

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Thinking Through an Identity Management Deployment

As the number of production deployments of Identity Management (IdM) grows and as many more pilots and proof of concepts come into being, it becomes (more and more) important to talk about best practices. Every production deployment needs to deal with things like failover, scalability, and performance.  In turn, there are a few practical questions that need to be answered, namely:

  • How many replicas do I need?
  • How should these replicas be distributed between my datacenters?
  • How should these replicas be connected to each other?

The answer to these questions depends on

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.NET Core on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

In November 2015, I blogged about the announcement to bring .NET to RHEL from the .NET Core upstream project to enterprise customers and developers, both as an RPM and as a Linux container.  That was quite a moment for the industry and, quite frankly, for me as well, having participated in the discussions that led to the significant announcement with Microsoft.  Since then, we have been in tight collaboration to make sure this day would actually arrive.  Despite the usual challenges with a relatively new open source project, the project was

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Red Hat at DockerCon 16 in Seattle

If you’re heading to DockerCon 16 next week in Seattle, connect with us to see why Fortune 500 organizations trust Red Hat for enterprise deployments. Red Hat subject matter experts will be onsite to walk you through real-world use cases for securely developing, deploying and managing container-based applications. 

Attend the State of Container Security Session

Join two of Red Hat’s Docker contributors discussing the state of container security today. Senior Software Engineer Mrunal Patel and Thomas Cameron, Global Evangelist of Emerging Technology are presenting on how you can secure your containerized microservices without slowing down development.

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