Looking Back on Containers in 2015

Woah.  2015 went by really quickly.  I do suppose it’s not all that surprising as time flies… especially when you’re having fun or… getting older (you pick).  In fact, we’ve already put 2 percent of 2016 behind us!  That said, before we get too deep into “the future”, and in consideration of Janus having not one but two faces, let’s take a quick trip down memory lane…

Without a doubt, 2015 was an exciting year for all things “container”, especially here at Red Hat.

To recap, the year started off with a bang when we announced the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host alongside Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.1.  Then – less than two months later

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4 Reasons to Attend KubeCon Next Week

Next week, hundreds of Kubernetes enthusiasts are heading to San Francisco for  KubeCon 2015, the first Kubernetes community conference. Why should you attend?

  1. Witness a variety of expert deep technical talks on containers and orchestrating them with Kubernetes.  For example, OpenShift architect Clayton Coleman is presenting “Application Development on a Cloud-Native Platform” at 1:50 p.m. PST, avatar.jpg.320x320pxon Monday, November 9, 2015. In the session, Clayton will cover workflow and tooling for application developers using Kubernetes as a development platform while still allowing developers to manage the lower level components of the system. This talk will show enhancements to core Kubernetes objects, and how they are being moved into the Kubernetes core over time.

  2.  Learn about the future of Platform-as-a-Service.
    PaaS isn’t static; it involves a constantly progressing set of technologies to enable a avatar.jpg.320x320px-1better approach to building and running applications. Ashesh Badani, general manager, OpenShift at Red Hat, is being joined by Google’s Craig McLuckie and others for a panel discussion around the future of Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS). Ashesh is responsible for Red Hat’s PaaS business. Check it out on Tuesday, November 10, 2015 at 11:30 a.m. PST.


  3. Get inspired about building highly scalable microservices-based applications.
    KubeCon is your opportunity to avatar.jpg.320x320px-2dig deeper into how to implement microservices. Red Hatter Christian Posta helps you to make microservices a reality with “Microservices aren’t just for unicorns: meet fabric8.io”. At 9 a.m. PST on Wednesday, November 11, 2015, Christian will walk attendees through building microservices with Fabric8 on top of Kubernetes.


  4. Connect with other Kubernetes enthusiasts, including Red Hatters.  Come by Red Hat’s booth (#1) connect with us on container security, orchestration, storage, management, and more. In addition, events outside the main conference track will allow attendees to interact with other Kubernetes enthusiasts.

If you are passionate about building highly scalable microservices-based apps, containerizing traditional apps, and/or are just getting started with Kubernetes, this is an event you won’t want to miss. For more information on KubeCon or to register for the event, please visit https://kubecon.io/.

The History of Containers

Given the recent massive spike in interest in Linux Containers, you could be forgiven for wondering, “Why now?”. It has been argued that the increasingly prevalent cloud computing model more closely resembles hosting providers than traditional enterprise IT, and that containers are a perfect match for this model.

Despite the sudden ubiquity of container technology, like so much in the world of open source software, containerization depends on a long series of previous innovations, especially in the operating system. “One cannot resist an idea whose time has come.” Containers are such an idea, one that has been a long time coming.

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Announcing “Yum + RPM for Containerized Applications” — Nulecule & Atomic App

The promise of Docker is that it simplifies application deployment, allows greater application density on hosts, and features a portable format that offers unparalleled flexibility over standard packaging. But one thing Docker doesn’t get you is the simplicity of `yum install foo` to install an application. Nor can Docker define or process a directed graph of container orchestration dependencies. We aim to change that.

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Webcast Tomorrow: Top 6 Misconceptions about Linux Containers

Linux containers have been getting a lot of hype recently, and it’s easy to understand why. Delivering applications to meet the demands of the businesIcon_RH_Object_Clipboard-Checklist-A_RGB_Buttons is challenging and containers are disrupting traditional application development and deployment models, enabling businesses to explore new, better ways to deliver products and services.

New innovations like the Docker image format and Kubernetes give you a simpler way to quickly create, package, assemble, and distribute applications. But with hype comes misunderstandings and misconceptions.

Join Red Hat and Cisco tomorrow, May 5, 2015 at 11:00 AM ET / 8:00 AM PT for the webcast, Top 6 Misconceptions about Linux Containers, to gain clarity around these misconceptions. In the webcast, you will:

  • Gain a pragmatic look at Linux containers.
  • Understand what benefits containers can deliver for you.
  • Discover what security, implementation, and other considerations you should understand before your organization embraces this technology.

If you haven’t already done so, register today.

Enterprise-Ready Container Orchestration with Kubernetes

Here on the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Blog we’ve dedicated a number of posts to containers and a variety of associated Red Hat solutions.  Whether you’re seeking to deploy Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 applications on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 as containers, hoping to better understand how atomic updates work, or are simply out to learn all you can about Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host – there’s likely a post (here) with the information you need.  However, we’ve yet to really explore container orchestration.  To this end, I invite you to read this new post from Red Hat’s own Joe Fernandes.  Joe talks about Kubernetes, Google’s tool for managing clusters of Linux containers, its progenitor (i.e Google’s Borg), and how Red Hat is building on top of Kubernetes to bring web-scale container infrastructure to enterprise customers.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host Opens New Possibilities for Red Hat Storage Customers

Ready to adopt Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host? I recommend you visit the Red Hat Storage Blog to learn more about how Red Hat Storage with Ceph & Gluster are compelling storage options for containerized environments.

Red Hat Storage

By Sayan Saha, Sr. Manager, Product Management, Storage & Data Business, Red Hat.

This week Red Hat announced the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host – a host environment optimized to run containerized applications with a minimal footprint. Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host simplifies maintenance using image-based update and rollback and includes orchestration toolsets such as kubernetes for managing containers across a cluster of hosts. The new Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host inherits the industry-leading hardware ecosystem, reliability, stability and security the industry has come to expect from Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

What this means for Red Hat Storage customers

This announcement is significant for Red Hat Storage customers on multiple fronts. Workloads running in containers require persistent storage for application code and data. Given the rapid growth in the number of containers within today’s IT shops, software-defined storage has an advantage over traditional storage…

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Top 7 Reasons to Use Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host

In November we announced Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Atomic Host Public Beta, a small footprint, container host based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.  It provides a stable host platform, optimized for running application containers, and brings a number of application software packaging and deployment benefits to customers.

What are the top 7 reasons to deploy containers on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Atomic Host?

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Performance Testing Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Atomic Host Beta on Amazon EC2

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Atomic Host Beta is an operating platform that is optimized and minimized to run containers. It packages key components of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 such as SELinux, systemd, and tuned with the kernel to facilitate running containers in a secure and optimized manner. It also offers Kubernetes and Docker to facilitate the rapid creation, deployment, and orchestration of containers – simplifying the life cycle management of applications and systems.

Containers allow users to put application and all of their runtime dependencies into secure packages that are both easy to deploy and easy to manage. Containers are also portable and images of a given container can be copied and replicated to other systems. Since containers are isolated from each other and are isolated from the host OS, libraries and application binaries can be updated individually without affecting other containers or the host OS (and vice versa).

The following video (below) mirrors the demo as presented

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