Unleash powerful Linux container-building capabilities with Buildah

Balancing size and features is a universal challenge when building software. So, it’s unsurprising that this holds true when building container images. If you don’t include enough packages in your base image, you end up with images which are difficult to troubleshoot, missing something you need, or just cause different development teams to add the exact same package to layered images (causing duplication). If you build it too big, people complain because it takes too long to download – especially for quick and dirty projects or demos. This is where Buildah comes in.

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Container-related Changes in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5

With Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5.0 released this week, we wanted to take a look at a few of the container-specific changes for users of Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host.

Buildah Now Fully Supported

With Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5, we now fully support using Buildah to create Docker and OCI-compliant container images. Buildah was introduced in 7.4.3 as a tech preview, and moves to fully supported in this release.

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Container Images and Hosts: Selecting the Right Components

We’ve published a new guide to help you select the right container hosts and images for you container workloads – whether it’s a single container running on a single host, or thousands of workloads running in a Kubernetes/OpenShift environment. Why? Because people don’t know what they don’t know and we are here to help.

Like “The Cloud” before it, a lot of promises are being made about what capabilities containers might deliver – does anybody remember the promises of cloud bursting? No, not that cloud bursting, this cloud bursting 🙂

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Container Migration Around The World

In this article I want to talk about a runC container which I want to migrate around the world while clients stay connected to the application.

In my previous Checkpoint/Restore In Userspace (CRIU) articles I introduced CRIU (From Checkpoint/Restore to Container Migration) and in the follow-up I gave an example how to use it in combination with containers (Container Live Migration Using runC and CRIU). Recently Christian Horn published an additional article about CRIU which is also a good starting point.

In my container I am running Xonotic. Xonotic calls itself ‘The Free and Fast Arena Shooter’. The part that is running in the container is the server part of the game to which multiple clients can connect to play together. In this article the client is running on my local system while the server and its container is live migrated around the world.

This article also gives detailed background information about 

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What’s New in Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host 7.4?

We’re pleased to announce that Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host 7.4 is now generally available. Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host is a lightweight, container-optimized version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host couples the flexible, modular capabilities of Linux containers with the reliability and security of Red Hat Enterprise Linux in a reduced footprint, to decrease the attack surface and provide only the packages needed to light up hardware and run containers. Here’s a look at some of the major changes in 7.4.

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Introducing the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Base Image

We’re excited to announce our latest step in the further optimizing of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) for containers with the release of the RHEL Atomic base image. This image is much smaller than the current RHEL base image, giving just enough to get started on building your application or service.

We carved out python, systemd, and yes, even Yum is gone – leaving you with only the bare bone essentials like glibc, rpm, bash, and their remaining dependencies. This leaves us with an image that’s just under 30MB compressed, 75MB on disk; composed of 81 packages.

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