Red Hat Virtualization 4.2 Beta is Live!

We are pleased to announce the beta availability of Red Hat Virtualization 4.2, the latest version of our Red Hat Virtualization platform. Sixteen months into its lifecycle, Red Hat Virtualization continues to provide enterprises with a rich and stable foundation for both existing applications and a new generation of workloads and solutions.

The beta release of Red Hat Virtualization 4.2 includes a number of new and updated features to help organizations streamline and automate operations, improve the virtualization administrator experience, and mitigate risk in the environment.

While there are numerous new features and bug fixes, there is not enough room to list them all here. However, I would like to highlight a few of the additions that make the RHV 4.2 beta remarkable. Some of the new features that you should look forward to include:

Updated User Interface (UI) – When RHV 4.0 was released in August of 2016, it showcased the new dashboard tab as not only a new way of viewing essential resource utilization within RHV but how virtualization administrators will interact with RHV  in the future. The RHV 4.2 beta has made significant strides in furthering those UI updates.

Disaster Recovery (DR) – This is a native site-to-site failover solution. Instead of an integration with a specific storage vendor, it depends on storage at both sites that can be replicated reliably and consistently. Under the covers, Ansible is used extensively to automate the failover and failback process.

Software Defined Networking (SDN) – Open Virtual Network (OVN) has been integrated with Red Hat Virtualization to deliver a native SDN solution, via Open vSwitch. It provides automated management of network infrastructure, a Neutron compatible API for external network providers, as well as network self-service for users, freeing up network administrators from infrastructure requests.

Metrics and Logging – The new metrics and logging solution is built around the Elasticsearch, Fluentd, and Kibana (EFK) stack; the same stack as used by Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform. The new metrics store provides much more functionality and details on the RHV environment than what was previously available.

High Performance Virtual Machine (VM) – The RHV 4.2 beta release provides a new virtual machine type called High Performance when configuring VMs. It is capable of running a VM with the highest possible performance; as close to bare metal as possible. This greatly streamlines the process of configuring the characteristics of a virtual machine over the previous manual only methods.

Support for Ceph via iSCSI – The Ceph iSCSI target has been tested and certified as a storage domain for virtual machines. This provides more infrastructure and deployment choices for engineers and architects.

Cisco ACI Integration – Cisco ACI provides overlay protocols that support both physical and virtual hosts in the same logical network even while running Layer 3 routing. This integration provides additional options for customers, especially those that utilize Cisco ACI as part of their infrastructure.

Many thanks to the engineers, product managers, project managers, writers, and everyone else that contributed to the delivery of this release!

For additional information on the Red Hat Virtualization 4.2 beta release, see the following links:

Hope this helps,

Captain KVM

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Atomic Host Beta: Tell Us What You Think

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It’s been one week since we announced the beta for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Atomic Host and we’re looking for your feedback. If you’ve downloaded and installed the beta, this is your chance to tell us what you think, and what you’d like to see in the product moving forward.

TechValidate is conducting a short, 5-minute survey on behalf of Red Hat. Why should you participate?

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Final Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Beta Now Available

When Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 was first introduced in 2007, it was done so with an expected seven year lifecycle. Five years later, in 2012, we saw the continued strong adoption of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 and decided to extend its seven year lifecycle to 10 years. Now, in 2014, the original retirement year for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5, we still see an active, dedicated customer base that has come to value this long, predictable lifecycle in addition to the platform’s inherent security, stability, and reliability.

Today, we are pleased to announce beta availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.11. This release continues to provide system administrators with a secure, stable, and reliable platform for their organization’s enterprise applications.

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Red Hat Unveils Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

Six months ago we announced the beta availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. Two months ago, at Red Hat Summit 2014, we announced the availability of a release candidate for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. All the while we have been validating what’s new, different, and exciting about what Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 has to offer – including:

Today we are pleased to announce the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7, the latest major release of our flagship platform. As stated in this morning’s press release:

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Is Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Beta “The 7th Guest”?

Someone out there “gets” the title, right?  No, I’m not suggesting that Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Beta is an interactive puzzle adventure game. The relationship, I suppose, is in fact based on a much looser association: this is our seventh major release and this post (as opposed to my first) is dedicated to Red Hat Enterprise Linux running as a guest on third party hypervisors.

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A New and Improved Installation Experience

The installation software used in Red Hat Enterprise Linux has a long and storied history. Hewn from a stone found deep underground in Durham, North Carolina (during the early days of Red Hat Linux), the installer has grown from a simple single-platform tool to a complex multi-architecture / multi-interface application used to deploy Red Hat Enterprise Linux. After more than ten years with the original evolving code base, the installer engineering team decided to use the advent of a new release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux as the perfect opportunity to make a few significant changes to the installation software. We are excited about these changes and hope that users will find the new installer to be more versatile and easier to use. Here are some of the main improvements and enhancements that you will encounter when working with the new installer for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Beta:

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Network Management, Bandwidth, and Security

It’s difficult to overestimate the importance of networking in today’s business environment. Since networking provides a central means for data exchange and collaboration, it is often a critical factor when it comes to determining an organization’s ultimate potential for success.

At Red Hat, we understand the importance of networking and the role it plays in maintaining business continuity. As such, we made networking one of the primary focus areas of development for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. Having incorporated numerous enhancements and performance optimizations into the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 beta – I’d like to take this opportunity to talk about “what’s new” with respect to improvements in network management, bandwidth, and security.

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Who Goes There? Identity Management in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Beta

It seems that the daily news is full of the fallout that results when companies fail to protect online identities. The ability to limit access to sensitive applications and information to the right people with the right credentials is critical to ensuring the overall security of your infrastructure; critical… but not always easy.

Until recently, options for centralized identity management for the Linux environment were limited. There was no turnkey domain controller-like solution for the Linux/UNIX environment. Some Linux shops integrated open source tools like Kerberos and DNS to create centralized Linux-based identity management, but this option could be time-consuming to develop and expensive to maintain. Others integrated Linux clients directly into Microsoft Active Directory, but this option limited their ability to take advantage of some useful native Linux functionality like sudo and automount.

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NFS & GFS2

In an effort to round out my post from this past Tuesday I’d like to share a little additional information on both Network File System (NFS) updates and enhancements to the GFS2 shared disk file system (…all, of course, in the context of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 beta).

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Testers Wanted: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Beta

We’re pleased to announce the beta availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. Ten years of inspiration, perspiration, and innovation have led to this, the next phase in realizing Red Hat’s vision for the open hybrid cloud and the future of enterprise computing.

With today’s announcement, we are inviting you – Red Hat customers, partners, and members of the public – to provide feedback on what we believe is our most ambitious release to date. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 is designed to provide the underpinning for future application architectures while delivering the flexibility, scalability, and performance needed to deploy across bare metal, virtual machines, and cloud infrastructure.

Based on Fedora 19 and the upstream Linux 3.10 kernel, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Beta showcases hundreds of new features and enhancements, including:

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