Ultimate Guide to Red Hat Summit 2018 Labs: Hands-on with RHEL

This year you’ve got a lot of decisions to make before you got to Red Hat Summit in San Francisco, CA from 8-10 May 2018.

There are breakout sessionsbirds-of-a-feather sessionsmini sessionspanelsworkshops, and instructor led labs that you’re trying to juggle into your daily schedule. To help with these plans, let’s try to provide an overview of the labs in this series.

In this article let’s examine a track focusing only on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). It’s a selection of labs where you’ll get hands-on with package management, OS security, dig into RHEL internals, build a RHEL image for the cloud and more.

The following hands-on labs are on the agenda, so let’s look at the details of each one.

Continue reading “Ultimate Guide to Red Hat Summit 2018 Labs: Hands-on with RHEL”

Ultimate Guide to Red Hat Summit 2018 Labs: Hands-on with Security

This year you’ve got a lot of decisions to make before you got to Red Hat Summit in San Francisco, CA from 8-10 May 2018.

There are breakout sessionsbirds-of-a-feather sessionsmini sessionspanelsworkshops, and instructor led labs that you’re trying to juggle into your daily schedule. To help with these plans, let’s try to provide an overview of the labs in this series.

In this article, the focus narrows to security, where you can get hands-on with everything from cloud security, security compliance automation, developing secure solutions and digging in to container security.

The following hands-on labs are on the agenda, so let’s look at the details of each one.

Continue reading “Ultimate Guide to Red Hat Summit 2018 Labs: Hands-on with Security”

Guide to Red Hat Summit 2018 Linux Container Labs

This year you’ve got a lot of decisions to make before you got to Red Hat Summit in San Francisco, CA from 8-10 May 2018.

There are breakout sessionsbirds-of-a-feather sessionsmini sessionspanelsworkshops, and instructor led labs that you’re trying to juggle into your daily schedule. To help with these plans, let’s try to provide an overview of the labs in this series.

Our first article is starting with a focus on Linux containers, where you can get hands-on with everything from container security, containerizing applications, developing container solutions and digging in to container internals.

The following hands-on labs are on the agenda, so let’s look at the details of each one.

Continue reading “Guide to Red Hat Summit 2018 Linux Container Labs”

Flying with a Safety Net: High Availability for SAP HANA in Public Clouds

For organizations running production applications, it is essential to provide 99.999% uptime for their mission critical applications and deploy their applications in a highly available configuration so that services are accessible at all times. This translates to accounting for all services within the application stack including storage, networking, and each service required to keep the application remaining online and active.

High Availability (HA) technology for Red Hat Enterprise Linux for SAP HANA is now supported on strategic Red Hat Certified Cloud and Service providers (CCSPs), starting with Microsoft Azure. The Red Hat High Availability Add-On is based on Pacemaker, an open source software clustering solution designed to protect the availability of applications. Support for HA works the same regardless of the deployment platform–bare metal or public clouds.

Continue reading “Flying with a Safety Net: High Availability for SAP HANA in Public Clouds”

UNIX/Linux and Me

This post is brought to you by Command Line Heroes, an original podcast from Red Hat.

Pure Gould

UNIX is C and C is for UNIX.

“I want to be an architect” was the mantra for some teenager in a British period TV series I watched in Ireland as a kid. For my final four years of secondary school (like high school) in Ireland it had become my mantra. I loved technical drawing and specifically drawing houses in perspective with shadow—it looked so realistic. I didn’t much care for computers as I couldn’t really afford one. I got to play on my girlfriend’s Commodore 64 and my dad bought me a scientific calculator that had about 2K of memory to write BASIC programs (for the millenials and younger, that was one of the first popular computer languages).

Studying computer science was not even on my radar—I wanted to continue learning the finer art of

Continue reading “UNIX/Linux and Me”

Power, Control Structures, and Open Source

This post is brought to you by Command Line Heroes, an original podcast from Red Hat.

My first encounter with computers

As a child, I perceived the world to be a pretty cold place filled with control structures—similar to the movie Tron. These control structures also seemed to be pretty imbalanced. When I was about 7 years old, I remember being at a local department store that had personal computers on display. They were powered up and each of them presented passing shoppers with an intimidating black screen, broken only by these white characters:

A>

I didn’t understand what it meant, or in retrospect, how this would sell computers. There were keyboards connected to each computer. I knew what they did from watching TV, so I hit a few keys. Characters began displaying across the screen and I soon discovered that you could also hit the “enter” key and the screen would change. It appeared that the computer was trying to interpret the words I was typing, but it refused to do anything except display the words

Continue reading “Power, Control Structures, and Open Source”

Red Hat Virtualization, Meltdown, and Spectre

In the last several weeks, many of you have likely heard about the new security threat that involves the ability to exploit common features of modern CPUs. These attacks, known as “Meltdown” and “Spectre” can impact both bare metal and virtual servers. Red Hat Virtualization has added the “IBRS Family” of CPUs to the supported Cluster CPU type as a means to help protect against the IPRS and IBPM attacks that would result in guest attacks.

Continue reading “Red Hat Virtualization, Meltdown, and Spectre”

Red Hat Virtualization 4.2 Beta 2 Available

We are pleased to announce the Beta 2 release of Red Hat Virtualization 4.2, the latest version of our Red Hat Virtualization platform. This follows the release of the Beta 1 on January 4 of this year, as we push closer to the public release of Red Hat Virtualization 4.2 in a few months.

While we covered many of the new features in the previous announcement, we would like to call attention to one of them as well as highlight another, specifically to involve the community in the feature testing:

Continue reading “Red Hat Virtualization 4.2 Beta 2 Available”

My Journey from BASIC to Linux

This post is brought to you by Command Line Heroes, an original podcast from Red Hat.

I think of computing today as being the convergence of at least three major threads that were once largely apart from each other. There were the proprietary hardware and software stacks: mainframes and their minicomputer counterparts. There was the proto-Internet and Unix, proprietary in their own way but leading to Linux and open source. And there was the personal computer.

Continue reading “My Journey from BASIC to Linux”

From Manual to Automated DevOps: One Man’s Journey

This post is brought to you by Command Line Heroes, an original podcast from Red Hat.

My journey, as one might say, in search of the Holy Grail or the great unicorn called DevOps, began well over 20 years ago; yet I never knew it at the time… Actually, it began in 1984 when I was 13 and got my own first computer, a Commodore VIC-20. It wasn’t the first computer that I had ever used but it was mine. I pushed that system with 3 ½ KB of RAM to its limits. Technology has grown by leaps and bounds in such a short timespan. Since those days, I’ve worn many hats. I’ve owned my own company, I’ve helped tech-edit books, and I’ve been pretty active in the open source community. Workshops, social media, MeetUps, Red Hat user groups (RHUGs), virtualization technology user groups (VTUGs), etc. have all allowed me to share and learn at the same time.

Fast forward 10 years, I’m a sergeant in the Army. Sometimes, when in garrison (which was rare), I got tasked out to a bit of side work on UNIX systems simply because nobody knew how to use them. These puppies were coupled together with many pre-internet technologies.

Continue reading “From Manual to Automated DevOps: One Man’s Journey”