Power, Control Structures, and Open Source

This post is brought to you by Command Line Heroes, an original podcast from Red Hat.

My first encounter with computers

As a child, I perceived the world to be a pretty cold place filled with control structures—similar to the movie Tron. These control structures also seemed to be pretty imbalanced. When I was about 7 years old, I remember being at a local department store that had personal computers on display. They were powered up and each of them presented passing shoppers with an intimidating black screen, broken only by these white characters:

A>

I didn’t understand what it meant, or in retrospect, how this would sell computers. There were keyboards connected to each computer. I knew what they did from watching TV, so I hit a few keys. Characters began displaying across the screen and I soon discovered that you could also hit the “enter” key and the screen would change. It appeared that the computer was trying to interpret the words I was typing, but it refused to do anything except display the words

Continue reading “Power, Control Structures, and Open Source”

Container Images and Hosts: Selecting the Right Components

We’ve published a new guide to help you select the right container hosts and images for you container workloads – whether it’s a single container running on a single host, or thousands of workloads running in a Kubernetes/OpenShift environment. Why? Because people don’t know what they don’t know and we are here to help.

Like “The Cloud” before it, a lot of promises are being made about what capabilities containers might deliver – does anybody remember the promises of cloud bursting? No, not that cloud bursting, this cloud bursting 🙂

Continue reading “Container Images and Hosts: Selecting the Right Components”

Container Tidbits: Understanding the docker-latest Package

Does your team want to move as quickly as possible? Are you and your development team looking for the latest features and not necessarily optimizing on stability? Are you just beginning with the docker runtime and not quite ready for container orchestration? Well, we have the answer, and it’s called the docker-latest package.

Background

About 6 months ago, Red Hat added a package called docker-latest. The idea is to have two packages in Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host. A very fast moving docker-latest package and a slower, but more stable package called, well of course, docker.

The reasoning is, the larger and more sophisticated your container infrastructure becomes, a more stable version is often what people want – but when split into small agile teams, or when just starting out, many teams will optimize on the latest features in a piece of software. Either way, we have you covered with Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host.

Continue reading “Container Tidbits: Understanding the docker-latest Package”

Evolution of Containers: Lessons Learned at ContainerCon Europe

Linux containers, and their use in the enterprise, are evolving rapidly. If I didn’t know this already, what I’m seeing at conferences like ContainerCon would confirm it. We’ve moved on from “what are containers, anyway?” to “let’s hunker down and get it right.”

Recently, I attended and spoke at LinuxCon/ContainerCon Europe. Like LinuxCon/ContainerCon North America, many of the keynotes touched on Linux container work going on in the community. At the European edition there was a particularly strong focus on Linux container security and networking. At least six sessions were focused on kernel security, orchestration security, and general container security. Four talks focused on container networking. Along with container security and networking, there were a lot of sessions about cloud native and containerized applications. 

Continue reading “Evolution of Containers: Lessons Learned at ContainerCon Europe”

Announcing Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host 7.2.6

Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host is a small footprint, purpose-built version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux that is designed to run containerized workloads. Building on the success of our last release, Red Hat’s Atomic-OpenShift team is excited to announce the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host 7.2.6. This release features improvements in rpm-ostree, cockpit, skopeo, docker, and the atomic CLI. The full release notes can be found here. This post is going to explore a major new feature

Continue reading “Announcing Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host 7.2.6”

Architecting Containers Part 5: Building a Secure and Manageable Container Software Supply Chain

Background

In Architecting Containers Part 4: Workload Characteristics and Candidates for Containerization we investigated the level of effort necessary to containerize different types of workloads. In this article I am going to address several challenges facing organizations that are deploying containers – how to patch containers and how to determine which teams are responsible for the container images. Should they be controlled by development or operations?

In addition, we are going to take a look at

Continue reading “Architecting Containers Part 5: Building a Secure and Manageable Container Software Supply Chain”

Architecting Containers Part 4: Workload Characteristics and Candidates for Containerization

Many development and operations teams are looking for guidelines to help them determine what applications can be containerized and how difficult it may be. In Architecting Containers Part 3: How the User Space Affects Your Applications we took an in depth look at how the user space affects applications for both developers and operations. In this article we are going to take a look at workload characteristics and the level of effort required to containerize different types of applications.

The goal of this article is to provide guidance based on current capabilities and best practices within

Continue reading “Architecting Containers Part 4: Workload Characteristics and Candidates for Containerization”

Container Tidbits: When Should I Break My Application into Multiple Containers?

There is a lot of confusion around which pieces of your application you should break into multiple containers and why. I recently responded to this thread on the Docker user mailing list which led me to writing today’s post. In this post I plan to examine an imaginary Java application that historically ran on a single Tomcat server and to explain why I would break it apart into separate containers. In an attempt to make things interesting – I will also aim to

Continue reading “Container Tidbits: When Should I Break My Application into Multiple Containers?”

Container Tidbits: Can Good Supply Chain Hygiene Mitigate Base Image Sizes?

With Docker moving all of their official images to Alpine, base image size is a hot topic.  Sure, having sane and minimal base images is important, but software supply chain hygiene is equally (if not more) important – interested to understand why?

Among other things, it’s important in a production container environment to have provenance (i.e. knowledge of where your container images came from). Using

Continue reading “Container Tidbits: Can Good Supply Chain Hygiene Mitigate Base Image Sizes?”

  • Page 1 of 2
  • 1
  • 2
  • >