Announcing VMware Guest Support for Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host

​With the release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host 7.4, we are excited to jointly announce official support for VMware’s ESXi and vCenter. While it’s always been possible to run Atomic Host in a VMware environment, Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host now supports VMware’s guest agent and can be listed as a supported guest OS. The Red Hat Atomic Image for vSphere now embeds the guest agent to provide the out-of-the-box experience and integration that end users expect.

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Five Reasons to Switch from vSphere to Red Hat Virtualization

It’s time to upgrade or to renew your VMware vSphere licenses. This decision is not easy for a few reasons such as:

You might be hesitantly considering paying for an upgrade and ELA renewal because you believe there is no (other) choice.

I have good news for you. There is a reliable and enterprise choice and switching has never been easier with the recent release of

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Getting Started with the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK)

Docker containers are used to package software applications into portable, isolated stores. Developing software with containers helps developers create applications that will run the same way on every platform. However modern microservice deployments typically use a scheduler such as Kubernetes to run in production. In order to fully simulate the production environment, developers require a local version of production tools. In the Red Hat stack, this is supplied by the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK).

The Red Hat CDK is a customized virtual machine that makes it easy to run complex deployments resembling production. This means complex applications can be developed using production grade tools from the very start

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Final Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Beta Now Available

When Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 was first introduced in 2007, it was done so with an expected seven year lifecycle. Five years later, in 2012, we saw the continued strong adoption of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 and decided to extend its seven year lifecycle to 10 years. Now, in 2014, the original retirement year for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5, we still see an active, dedicated customer base that has come to value this long, predictable lifecycle in addition to the platform’s inherent security, stability, and reliability.

Today, we are pleased to announce beta availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.11. This release continues to provide system administrators with a secure, stable, and reliable platform for their organization’s enterprise applications.

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Red Hat Enterprise Linux: Beyond the World Records

In a recent post, we reviewed the 10 world record results set by Red Hat Enterprise Linux on the Intel Xeon processor E7 v2 family.  Besides showcasing the extreme capabilities of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, these performance achievements tell another compelling story – Red Hat Enterprise Linux has become an exceedingly popular choice when it comes to tough workloads.

For example, consider the share of Red Hat Enterprise Linux versus other operating systems used to produce these records. Out of 20 world record benchmark results (22 total submissions, 3 results were tied) posted by eight different OEM partners at the Intel Xeon processor E7 v2 family announcement, Red Hat Enterprise Linux was used in 12. Seventy-five percent of the hardware vendors taking part in this process chose to publish their world record benchmarks on the new family of processors using Red Hat Enterprise Linux. The chart below shows the significance of this adoption.

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Is Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Beta “The 7th Guest”?

Someone out there “gets” the title, right?  No, I’m not suggesting that Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Beta is an interactive puzzle adventure game. The relationship, I suppose, is in fact based on a much looser association: this is our seventh major release and this post (as opposed to my first) is dedicated to Red Hat Enterprise Linux running as a guest on third party hypervisors.

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KVM Virtualization: Refining the Virtual World with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Beta

Ever since Red Hat Enterprise Linux added KVM Virtualization as a kernel-based hypervisor to run virtual machines (way back in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.4), the operating system took on a dual personality.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux became both a Virtualization host for high density virtual data centers / cloud service platforms, and a guest operating system running on third party hypervisors such as VMware vSphere and Microsoft Hyper-V. As the topic is sufficiently broad, I plan to split my discussion of virtualization into two posts.

Today’s post will discuss Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 beta as a hypervisor using KVM Virtualization technology and it will highlight a few key enhancements that make Red Hat Enterprise Linux the operating system of choice for modern hybrid data centers. While the features that I will review are inherently those that I find to be the most exciting (note: I’m hoping you will find them to be exciting and useful as well), a complete list is available in the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 beta release notes.

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