What’s New in Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host 7.2.5


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It’s been a busy few weeks for us on the Atomic Host team, and we’re excited to announce the release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host 7.2.5! This is a big one too. For those not familiar with our release cadence, we release a new version of Atomic Host every six weeks. This enables us to balance the reliability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux with exciting new features and capabilities from our Project Atomic upstream community in a production ready, supportable manor.

 

Now, let’s walk through some key new features in Atomic Host:

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rkt, appc, and Docker: A Take on the Linux Container Upstream

At this week’s CoreOS Fest in San Francisco, CoreOS is – unsurprisingly – pushing hard on the Application Container Spec (appc) and its first implementation, rkt, making it the topic of the first session after the keynote and a bold story about broad adoption.

When making technology decisions, Red Hat continuously evaluates all available options with the goal of selecting the best technologies that are supported by upstream communities. This is why Red Hat is engaging upstream in appc to actively contribute to the specification.

Red Hat engages in many upstream communities.  However, this engagement should not imply full support, or that we consider appc or rkt ready for

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Performance Testing Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Atomic Host Beta on Amazon EC2

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Atomic Host Beta is an operating platform that is optimized and minimized to run containers. It packages key components of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 such as SELinux, systemd, and tuned with the kernel to facilitate running containers in a secure and optimized manner. It also offers Kubernetes and Docker to facilitate the rapid creation, deployment, and orchestration of containers – simplifying the life cycle management of applications and systems.

Containers allow users to put application and all of their runtime dependencies into secure packages that are both easy to deploy and easy to manage. Containers are also portable and images of a given container can be copied and replicated to other systems. Since containers are isolated from each other and are isolated from the host OS, libraries and application binaries can be updated individually without affecting other containers or the host OS (and vice versa).

The following video (below) mirrors the demo as presented

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The Application Apartment Complex: Red Hat Enterprise Linux & Linux Containers

The advent of any new technology tends to generate a lot of excitement.  Over the course of my career, however, I have never experienced “a buzz” like what we are seeing around Linux containers and application packaging and isolation, containerized applications built in the Docker format.  From my perspective, the ways in which containers may influence our ever evolving technological ecosystem are, quite possibly, limitless…okay, limitless may be strong, and while “game changing technology” may sound cliche, it’s not far from the truth in this case.

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