Time to Upgrade to Red Hat Virtualization 4

It has been over five years since the release of Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.0. In just under 3 months (September 30) it will hit the end of it’s support lifecycle, and we will retire the 3.x version. At that same time, Red Hat Virtualization 4.0 will have been out for 13 months, and 4.1 for 5 months.

If you have not yet started the upgrade plan and process from version 3 to version 4, now is the time.

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Integrating Red Hat Virtualization and Red Hat OpenStack Platform with Neutron Networking

As applications are designed, redesigned, or even simply thought about at a high level, we frequently think about technical barriers along side business needs. Business needs may dictate that a new architecture move forward, but technical limitations can sometimes counter how far forward – unless there is something to bridge the gap. The new Neutron network integration between Red Hat Virtualization (RHV) and Red Hat OpenStack Platform (RHOSP) provides such a bridge for business and technical solutions.

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Self-Service Portals and Virtualization

There have been countless advances in technology in the last few years; both in general and at Red Hat. To list just the ones specific to Red Hat could actually boggle the mind. Arguably, some of the biggest advances have come more in the form of “soft” skills. Namely, Red Hat has become really good at listening – not only to our own customers but to our competitors’ customers as well. This is no more apparent than in our approach to applying a self-service catalog to virtualization. Specifically, pairing Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization (RHEV) with CloudForms for the purpose of streamlining and automation of virtual machine provisioning.

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Choosing a Platform Based on Workload Characteristics

Paradoxically, there has never been a better or more confusing time to discuss which platform is most appropriate for a given workload.  As we seek to solve problems around automation, continuous integration / continuous delivery, ease of upgrades, operational complexity, uptime, compliance, and many other complex issues – it quickly becomes clear that there are more than a few viable options.  Making matters worse – there is too much focus on the “how” (to adopt a given platform) and not enough focus onthe “why”. To this end, I’d like to address more of the “why” in an attempt to better influence the “how”.

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Using Hooks in Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization

As a Solutions Architect, I enjoy creating and adding custom configurations to my Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization(RHEV) environment using a feature called hooks. A hook is a custom script that executes at a certain point during a RHEV event. You can attach scripts to several events. To see the full list of RHEV hooks, do a directory listing of “/usr/libexec/vdsm/hooks” on a RHEV hypervisor and you will see the below list.

 

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Supercharge Your Network Throughput via Single Root I/O Virtualization (SR-IOV)

Our previous blog explored the basics of SR-IOV, this write-up will highlight how SR-IOV works in Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization. Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.6 enabled SR-IOV to supercharge the network throughput process. This process is easily explained by looking at an example of a logical network in Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization Manager (RHEV-M).

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Single Root I/O Virtualization (SR-IOV) Primer

Many IT organizations have embraced virtualization technologies to leverage well known benefits such as server consolidation, reduced costs, scalability, high utilization rates and so on. Although these benefits are great, sometimes they can cause performance issues due to the overwhelming usage of I/O. One method of reducing performance issues is to enable SR-IOV capabilities that allow a PCIe device to appear to be multiple separate physical PCIe devices. The purpose of SR-IOV is to provide isolation of resources that enable the scalability of VMs and to enable a near-bare metal

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Viewing the Horizon from the Cockpit

One of my favorite things about technology is seeing what’s next. I often find myself asking, “…what’s on the horizon?” Or, better yet, “…what’s beyond the horizon?” In the case of Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization (RHEV), specifically the hypervisor, “next generation node” is hovering in the distance. I anticipate this advance to be significant  for both Red Hat partners and customers.

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Virtual Machine Migration Best Practices

Lately, there has been in increase in IT organizations migrating their traditional virtualization workloads to open-source platforms such as Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization (RHEV) . Although there are many reasons for migrating (e.g. cost, features), one key advantage stands out for the open source alternatives. Organizations are now seeing the viability of building on the same platform to integrate open source cloud solutions with traditional applications. No single platform is optimized for each workload type or tier. Not only do organizations get to take advantage of the fast innovation of open source, but they also realize significant cost savings.

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Conversations from the Field: Building a Bridge to the Cloud

Cloud conversations are evolving at a seemingly ever increasing pace. In my experience, nearly all “…what is the cloud?” type conversations have long since past. In fact, for some organizations, private and public clouds are now central to daily business operations. For the both the early and late majority, however, their (usually large) install base of traditional applications makes the cloud far from reality. These organizations tend to have significant investments in proprietary virtualization, management, and operations technologies, and it’s not a given that these applications are cloud ready (today). While many proprietary technology vendors offer re-packaged versions of existing products to create a thin veil of “cloudiness” – this style of cloud enablement usually comes at a heavy price

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