Combining PTP with NTP to Get the Best of Both Worlds

There are two supported protocols in Red Hat Enterprise Linux for synchronization of computer clocks over a network. The older and more well-known protocol is the Network Time Protocol (NTP). In its fourth version, NTP is defined by IETF in RFC 5905. The newer protocol is the Precision Time Protocol (PTP), which is defined in the IEEE 1588-2008 standard.

The reference implementation of NTP is provided in the ntp package. Starting with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.0 (and now in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.8) a more versatile NTP implementation is also provided via the chrony package, which can usually synchronize the clock with better accuracy and has other advantages over the reference implementation. PTP is implemented in the linuxptp package.

With two different protocols designed for synchronization of clocks, there is an obvious question as to which one is

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Conversations from the Field: Building a Bridge to the Cloud

Cloud conversations are evolving at a seemingly ever increasing pace. In my experience, nearly all “…what is the cloud?” type conversations have long since past. In fact, for some organizations, private and public clouds are now central to daily business operations. For the both the early and late majority, however, their (usually large) install base of traditional applications makes the cloud far from reality. These organizations tend to have significant investments in proprietary virtualization, management, and operations technologies, and it’s not a given that these applications are cloud ready (today). While many proprietary technology vendors offer re-packaged versions of existing products to create a thin veil of “cloudiness” – this style of cloud enablement usually comes at a heavy price

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Containerize Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 Applications to Run on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

What if you could run your existing Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 applications on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 without porting or making changes to your source code? Today, we are pleased to announce the immediate availability of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 platform image, which allows for the creation of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6-based application containers. Applications that have been developed, tested, and certified for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 systems can now be deployed as a container and run on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 as a container host.

rhel-6-platform-imageThis new platform image allows customers to

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Now Available: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Release Candidate

In followup to last week’s announcement, the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Release Candidate (RC) is now publicly available for testing.

Vital for helping Red Hat’s strategic partners facilitate full certification of their applications and systems with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 RC is now accessible to all interested parties, from end users to enterprises, seeking to gain insight into how Red Hat redefines the enterprise operating system.

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Mitigate TCP SYN Flood Attacks with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Beta

Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks are becoming increasingly commonplace as business becomes more and more dependent on delivering services over the Internet.  One of the most common types of DDoS attacks is the well-known SYN-flood attack. It is a basic end-host resource attack designed to bring your server to its knees.  As a result, your server is unable to properly handle any new incoming connection requests.

Recently at DevConf.cz 2014, I gave a talk focusing on how you can survive TCP SYN-flooding attacks by implementing some recently developed kernel level Netfilter/iptables defense mechanisms. In this post I will provide a more condensed version of the talk highlighting how you can use these same techniques to protect your servers running Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Beta.

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Red Hat Enterprise Linux: Beyond the World Records

In a recent post, we reviewed the 10 world record results set by Red Hat Enterprise Linux on the Intel Xeon processor E7 v2 family.  Besides showcasing the extreme capabilities of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, these performance achievements tell another compelling story – Red Hat Enterprise Linux has become an exceedingly popular choice when it comes to tough workloads.

For example, consider the share of Red Hat Enterprise Linux versus other operating systems used to produce these records. Out of 20 world record benchmark results (22 total submissions, 3 results were tied) posted by eight different OEM partners at the Intel Xeon processor E7 v2 family announcement, Red Hat Enterprise Linux was used in 12. Seventy-five percent of the hardware vendors taking part in this process chose to publish their world record benchmarks on the new family of processors using Red Hat Enterprise Linux. The chart below shows the significance of this adoption.

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Red Hat Enterprise Linux Powers Scalable Computing Platforms with 10 New World Record Benchmarks

We’ve often talked about how Red Hat Enterprise Linux was fueling top benchmark results on the latest generation of Intel Xeon processors.

Today, we’re pleased to say that Red Hat Enterprise Linux has again demonstrated how an OS platform can handle the rigors of highly multi-threaded processing and on-demand scaling. In the most recent set of benchmarks done with one of the latest cutting edge processors, the Intel Xeon processor E7 v2 family, Red Hat Enterprise Linux claims 10 new world records. Here are these leading results at a glance:

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Is Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Beta “The 7th Guest”?

Someone out there “gets” the title, right?  No, I’m not suggesting that Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Beta is an interactive puzzle adventure game. The relationship, I suppose, is in fact based on a much looser association: this is our seventh major release and this post (as opposed to my first) is dedicated to Red Hat Enterprise Linux running as a guest on third party hypervisors.

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A New and Improved Installation Experience

The installation software used in Red Hat Enterprise Linux has a long and storied history. Hewn from a stone found deep underground in Durham, North Carolina (during the early days of Red Hat Linux), the installer has grown from a simple single-platform tool to a complex multi-architecture / multi-interface application used to deploy Red Hat Enterprise Linux. After more than ten years with the original evolving code base, the installer engineering team decided to use the advent of a new release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux as the perfect opportunity to make a few significant changes to the installation software. We are excited about these changes and hope that users will find the new installer to be more versatile and easier to use. Here are some of the main improvements and enhancements that you will encounter when working with the new installer for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Beta:

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KVM Virtualization: Refining the Virtual World with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Beta

Ever since Red Hat Enterprise Linux added KVM Virtualization as a kernel-based hypervisor to run virtual machines (way back in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.4), the operating system took on a dual personality.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux became both a Virtualization host for high density virtual data centers / cloud service platforms, and a guest operating system running on third party hypervisors such as VMware vSphere and Microsoft Hyper-V. As the topic is sufficiently broad, I plan to split my discussion of virtualization into two posts.

Today’s post will discuss Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 beta as a hypervisor using KVM Virtualization technology and it will highlight a few key enhancements that make Red Hat Enterprise Linux the operating system of choice for modern hybrid data centers. While the features that I will review are inherently those that I find to be the most exciting (note: I’m hoping you will find them to be exciting and useful as well), a complete list is available in the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 beta release notes.

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