Red Hat IT Single Sign On(SSO) Runs on Red Hat Virtualization

Red Hat is best known for Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and for being a leader in driving open source development projects. In many cases, the upstream projects then become Red Hat products that provide enterprise functionality elsewhere in the stack.

In a previous blog post, I detailed how we use Red Hat Single Sign On (SSO) to provide a robust and scalable authentication system for public web properties. Applications, such a Red Hat SSO, can obviously be deployed in a variety of platforms. Red Hat IT selected to adopt a hybrid-cloud deployment model for Red Hat SSO, as the majority of normal traffic for https://sso.redhat.com is serviced out of one of our corporate data centers. SSO and virtually every other application runs on top of Red Hat Virtualization.

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Digital Foundations – Challenges CIOs Must Embrace

When building anything substantial, such as a house or bridge, you start by laying down a solid foundation. Nothing changes this aspect of building brick by brick when you move from traditional constructions to application development and architecting your supporting infrastructure. Throw in Cloud terminology and you might think that the principles of a solid foundation are a bit flighty, but nothing is further from the truth.

When looking to manage an organization’s journey into their digital future, CIOs are dealing with a lot of challenges. Challenges that they face on the road to digital transformation can be daunting as first glance, but must be embraced to properly navigate the road to success.

Digital Foundations

Let’s take a look in this first article at the challenges CIOs must embrace before diving into how to

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Your Cloud Installed Before Lunch with QuickStart Cloud Installer 1.0

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Figure 1. Inside QuickStart Cloud Installer.

What if I told you that you can have your Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) based Cloud infrastructure, with Red Hat Virtualization, OpenStack, OpenShift and CloudForms all setup before you have to stop for lunch?

Would you be surprised?

Could you do that today?

In most cases I am betting your answer would be not possible, not even on your best day. Not to worry, the solution is here and it’s called the QuickStart Cloud Installer (QCI).

Today Red Hat announced the general availability of

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Combining PTP with NTP to Get the Best of Both Worlds

There are two supported protocols in Red Hat Enterprise Linux for synchronization of computer clocks over a network. The older and more well-known protocol is the Network Time Protocol (NTP). In its fourth version, NTP is defined by IETF in RFC 5905. The newer protocol is the Precision Time Protocol (PTP), which is defined in the IEEE 1588-2008 standard.

The reference implementation of NTP is provided in the ntp package. Starting with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.0 (and now in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.8) a more versatile NTP implementation is also provided via the chrony package, which can usually synchronize the clock with better accuracy and has other advantages over the reference implementation. PTP is implemented in the linuxptp package.

With two different protocols designed for synchronization of clocks, there is an obvious question as to which one is

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Conversations from the Field: Building a Bridge to the Cloud

Cloud conversations are evolving at a seemingly ever increasing pace. In my experience, nearly all “…what is the cloud?” type conversations have long since past. In fact, for some organizations, private and public clouds are now central to daily business operations. For the both the early and late majority, however, their (usually large) install base of traditional applications makes the cloud far from reality. These organizations tend to have significant investments in proprietary virtualization, management, and operations technologies, and it’s not a given that these applications are cloud ready (today). While many proprietary technology vendors offer re-packaged versions of existing products to create a thin veil of “cloudiness” – this style of cloud enablement usually comes at a heavy price

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Containerize Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 Applications to Run on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

What if you could run your existing Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 applications on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 without porting or making changes to your source code? Today, we are pleased to announce the immediate availability of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 platform image, which allows for the creation of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6-based application containers. Applications that have been developed, tested, and certified for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 systems can now be deployed as a container and run on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 as a container host.

rhel-6-platform-imageThis new platform image allows customers to

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Now Available: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Release Candidate

In followup to last week’s announcement, the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Release Candidate (RC) is now publicly available for testing.

Vital for helping Red Hat’s strategic partners facilitate full certification of their applications and systems with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 RC is now accessible to all interested parties, from end users to enterprises, seeking to gain insight into how Red Hat redefines the enterprise operating system.

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Mitigate TCP SYN Flood Attacks with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Beta

Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks are becoming increasingly commonplace as business becomes more and more dependent on delivering services over the Internet.  One of the most common types of DDoS attacks is the well-known SYN-flood attack. It is a basic end-host resource attack designed to bring your server to its knees.  As a result, your server is unable to properly handle any new incoming connection requests.

Recently at DevConf.cz 2014, I gave a talk focusing on how you can survive TCP SYN-flooding attacks by implementing some recently developed kernel level Netfilter/iptables defense mechanisms. In this post I will provide a more condensed version of the talk highlighting how you can use these same techniques to protect your servers running Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Beta.

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