Identity Management or Red Hat Directory Server – Which One Should I Use?

In the identity management server space Red Hat has two offerings: Identity Management (IdM) in Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Red Hat Directory Server (RHDS). This article is dedicated to helping you understand why there are two solutions and how to chose the best one for your environment.

Before diving in too deep

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Direct, or Indirect, that is the Question…

In my last post I reviewed some of my observations from the RSA Security Conference. As mentioned, I enjoyed the opportunity to speak with conference attendees about Red Hat’s Identity Management (IdM) offerings. That said, I was quick to note that whether I’m out-and-about staffing an event or “back home” answering e-mails – one of the most frequently asked questions I receive goes something like this: “…I’m roughly familiar with both direct and indirect integration options… and I’ve read some of the respective ‘pros’ and ‘cons’… but I’m still not sure which approach to use… what should I do?” If you’ve ever asked a similar question – I have some good news – today’s post will help you to determine which option aligns best with your current (and future) needs.

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Red Hat Delivers Leading Application Performance with the Latest Intel Xeon Processors

With every new Intel Xeon processor generation, the benefits typically span beyond simple increases in transistor counts or the number of cores within each processor. Things like increased memory capacity per chip or larger on-chip caches are tangible and measurable, and often have a direct effect on performance, resulting in record-breaking scores on various standard benchmarks.

There is, however, more to every new processor family launch than meets the eye. These new chips often send a ripple of innovation throughout our ecosystem of partners, forcing them to re-evaluate and re-visit existing performance results and break the status quo. The ability to support these partners is of paramount importance to Red Hat and, as a result, Red Hat Enterprise Linux is often being selected by our partners to support their ongoing benchmarking efforts.

Yesterday, Intel launched the Intel Xeon E7 v3 processor family with several new world record industry-standard benchmarks. Red Hat Enterprise Linux was used in nearly one-third of all results. The following table captures these leading results

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rkt, appc, and Docker: A Take on the Linux Container Upstream

At this week’s CoreOS Fest in San Francisco, CoreOS is – unsurprisingly – pushing hard on the Application Container Spec (appc) and its first implementation, rkt, making it the topic of the first session after the keynote and a bold story about broad adoption.

When making technology decisions, Red Hat continuously evaluates all available options with the goal of selecting the best technologies that are supported by upstream communities. This is why Red Hat is engaging upstream in appc to actively contribute to the specification.

Red Hat engages in many upstream communities.  However, this engagement should not imply full support, or that we consider appc or rkt ready for

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Webcast Tomorrow: Top 6 Misconceptions about Linux Containers

Linux containers have been getting a lot of hype recently, and it’s easy to understand why. Delivering applications to meet the demands of the businesIcon_RH_Object_Clipboard-Checklist-A_RGB_Buttons is challenging and containers are disrupting traditional application development and deployment models, enabling businesses to explore new, better ways to deliver products and services.

New innovations like the Docker image format and Kubernetes give you a simpler way to quickly create, package, assemble, and distribute applications. But with hype comes misunderstandings and misconceptions.

Join Red Hat and Cisco tomorrow, May 5, 2015 at 11:00 AM ET / 8:00 AM PT for the webcast, Top 6 Misconceptions about Linux Containers, to gain clarity around these misconceptions. In the webcast, you will:

  • Gain a pragmatic look at Linux containers.
  • Understand what benefits containers can deliver for you.
  • Discover what security, implementation, and other considerations you should understand before your organization embraces this technology.

If you haven’t already done so, register today.

Enterprise-Ready Container Orchestration with Kubernetes

Here on the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Blog we’ve dedicated a number of posts to containers and a variety of associated Red Hat solutions.  Whether you’re seeking to deploy Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 applications on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 as containers, hoping to better understand how atomic updates work, or are simply out to learn all you can about Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host – there’s likely a post (here) with the information you need.  However, we’ve yet to really explore container orchestration.  To this end, I invite you to read this new post from Red Hat’s own Joe Fernandes.  Joe talks about Kubernetes, Google’s tool for managing clusters of Linux containers, its progenitor (i.e Google’s Borg), and how Red Hat is building on top of Kubernetes to bring web-scale container infrastructure to enterprise customers.

Understanding the Changes to ‘docker search’ and ‘docker pull’ in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.1

If you’re working with container images on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.1 or Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host, you might have noticed that the search and pull behavior of the included docker tool works slightly differently than it does if you’re working with that of the upstream project. This is intentional.

When we started the planning process for containers in RHEL 7.1, we had 3 goals in mind:

  1. Give control over the search path to the end-user administrator
  2. Enable a federated approach to search and discovery of docker-formatted container images
  3. Support the ability for Red Hat customers to consume container images and other content included as part of their Red Hat Subscription

The changes we implemented, which are documented on the Red Hat Customer Portal, affect three different areas of the tool:

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Forrester’s Dave Bartoletti Reports on Container Usage at Red Hat Partner Conference

20150408_110418Yesterday, at Red Hat’s annual North America Partner Conference (in Orlando, FL), Dave Bartoletti, principal analyst with Forrester Research, told hundreds of attendees about a recently completed market research program undertaken by Forrester and sponsored by Red Hat. In this study, 194 developers and IT decision-makers at mid- to large-size companies were surveyed as to their plans and expectations for container technologies.

What they shared, indicates that

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SSSD vs Winbind

In a previous post, I compared the features and capabilities of Samba winbind and SSSD. In this post, I will focus on formulating a set of criteria for how to choose between SSSD and winbind. In general, my recommendation is to choose SSSD… but there are some notable exceptions.

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