Why Now is the Perfect Time to Adopt Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization

IT decision makers seem to be up in arms regarding discussions on “next generation” technologies.  In the past three months it has been nearly impossible to hold a conversation where the terms cloud, OpenStack, or (Linux) containers don’t surface.  Hot topics and buzzwords aside, it has become clear (to me) that the right mix of market conditions are causing organizations to express a renewed interest in enterprise virtualization.

Many organizations are now ready to adopt the next generation of server hardware.  The popular Ivy Bridge and Sandy Bridge chipsets from Intel are four to five years old and those who purchased such hardware tend to refresh their equipment every four to five years.  In addition, we see Intel Haswell technology approaching its third anniversary.  Organizations that lease hardware on a three year cycle will also be looking at what the next generation of hardware has to offer.

What does a potential wave of hardware refresh have to do with a renewed interest in enterprise virtualization?  To no one’s surprise

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Conversations from the Field: Building a Bridge to the Cloud

Cloud conversations are evolving at a seemingly ever increasing pace. In my experience, nearly all “…what is the cloud?” type conversations have long since past. In fact, for some organizations, private and public clouds are now central to daily business operations. For the both the early and late majority, however, their (usually large) install base of traditional applications makes the cloud far from reality. These organizations tend to have significant investments in proprietary virtualization, management, and operations technologies, and it’s not a given that these applications are cloud ready (today). While many proprietary technology vendors offer re-packaged versions of existing products to create a thin veil of “cloudiness” – this style of cloud enablement usually comes at a heavy price

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Top 5 Skills Virtualization Admins Must Have to Stay Relevant in 2016

In the past few years, virtualization admins have been hailed as heroes for enabling their organizations to significantly slash costs while improving service levels to the lines of business. Since the IT industry is constantly evolving, how can virtualization admins position themselves for success and avoid being rubber ducks in 2016? Below, we will look at 5 skills that should be in your toolkit in order to remain relevant in your organization.

1. Develop a deep understanding of how DevOps fits into your organization

According to Gartner, “By 2016, DevOps will evolve from a niche strategy employed by large cloud providers to a mainstream strategy employed by 25 percent of Global 2000 organizations.” Like many people, you might be asking yourself – what exactly does DevOps mean? DevOps is

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What Customers Want

Today, Red Hat and Microsoft announced a broad partnership that includes many facets including Microsoft becoming a Red Hat Certified Cloud and Service Provider (CCSP), the availability of many of our products on Microsoft Azure, integrated customer service delivery for Red Hat products deployed on premise and on Microsoft Azure, Microsoft .NET integration with many of our platform products, and plans for management tooling integration for open hybrid cloud implementations.

This is something much bigger than just a partnership, and is an evolution that we believe fits perfectly into our overall strategy. Anyone who has followed Red Hat for the past three years knows that we are driving forward with a market vision we refer to as open hybrid cloud. For many, this simply means private-and-public cloud. For Red Hat, we take the word hybrid very seriously, and… it means much more than private and public cloud.

Hybrid means customer choice, and also means acknowledging that most customers have heterogeneous environments. Customers want choice when it comes to the public clouds, and since many rely on Red Hat Enterprise Linux to run their most critical business applications, they are looking for myriad cloud choices for where to run these applications. Making Red Hat Enterprise Linux available on Microsoft Azure

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Red Hat Directory Server 10 Now Generally Available

Today, we are pleased to announced the general availability of Red Hat Directory Server 10, the latest version of Red Hat’s open source, network-based registry server. Built on the technologies delivered by the 389 Directory Server project, Red Hat Directory Server offers a Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP)-compliant server that centralizes critical application information, simplifies user management and enhances security across an entire organization.

As a tool for building business applications, Red Hat Directory Server provides

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Virtual Machines or Containers? Maybe Both?

Over the last 18 months, especially since the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7, “containers” have emerged as a hot topic. With the more recent introduction of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host, an operating system optimized for running the next generation of applications with Linux containers, one might wonder… what about virtualization? In that the benefits of containerization seem to overlap those of traditional virtualization, how do organizations know when to pick one approach over the other?

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Shaping the Performance of a Linux Distro: Inside Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

Backstory

Red Hat’s Performance Engineering team is responsible for the performance of many of Red Hat’s products.  We cover existing products such as Red Hat Enterprise Linux, OpenStack Platform, OpenShift and Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization, as well as newer products like Ceph and CloudForms.

Although these days we contribute extensively to Red Hat’s cloud offerings, Red Hat Enterprise Linux remains a core responsibility as the building block for our ecosystem of customers and partners, plus much of Red Hat’s growing product portfolio.

Prior to beginning efforts on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 in earnest

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What’s Moving in the World of POWER?

Linux permanently changed the landscape of the datacenter by creating a community approach to rapid innovation. Its introduction and widespread adoption have fueled a shift from closed to open systems, often times providing greater resiliency than other operating environments. Commodity x86 architectures are only one slice of a much larger market for reliable open source enterprise-class systems – and Linux has for many years been a cross-platform operating system. For example, did you know that Red Hat Enterprise Linux also runs on IBM’s Power Systems (POWER) and z Systems architectures? These options give IT organizations flexibility with respect to hardware for workloads and use cases ranging from big data analytics to cloud computing. Ensuring that Red Hat Enterprise Linux runs on IBM’s Power Systems and z Systems architectures gives our customers a broad range of application and deployment choices.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux for Power and Red Hat Enterprise Linux for System z are built

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Top 7 Reasons to Use Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host

In November we announced Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Atomic Host Public Beta, a small footprint, container host based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.  It provides a stable host platform, optimized for running application containers, and brings a number of application software packaging and deployment benefits to customers.

What are the top 7 reasons to deploy containers on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Atomic Host?

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KVM Virtualization: Refining the Virtual World with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Beta

Ever since Red Hat Enterprise Linux added KVM Virtualization as a kernel-based hypervisor to run virtual machines (way back in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.4), the operating system took on a dual personality.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux became both a Virtualization host for high density virtual data centers / cloud service platforms, and a guest operating system running on third party hypervisors such as VMware vSphere and Microsoft Hyper-V. As the topic is sufficiently broad, I plan to split my discussion of virtualization into two posts.

Today’s post will discuss Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 beta as a hypervisor using KVM Virtualization technology and it will highlight a few key enhancements that make Red Hat Enterprise Linux the operating system of choice for modern hybrid data centers. While the features that I will review are inherently those that I find to be the most exciting (note: I’m hoping you will find them to be exciting and useful as well), a complete list is available in the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 beta release notes.

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