Red Hat Enterprise Linux Brings Forth Performance and Scalability Features of New Intel Xeon Processor Family

Last week, Intel launched the new family of Intel® Xeon® scalable processors with new features such as Intel Advanced Vector Extensions 512 (Intel AVX-512), which boost performance of computationally intensive tasks, a new Intel Mesh Architecture for reduced system latency, Intel QuickAssist Technology for hardware acceleration of cryptography and data compression operations and integrated high-speed fabric with Intel Omni-Path Architecture. According to Intel, 

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Supercomputing & Red Hat: What’s Happening at ISC 2017?

Twice a year the most prominent supercomputing sites in the world get to showcase their capabilities and compete for a Top500 spot. With Linux dominating the list, Red Hat is paying close attention to the latest changes that will be announced at International Supercomputing (ISC) show in Frankfurt, Germany between June 18 to June 22, 2017.

While supercomputers of the past were often proprietary, the trend of building them out of commodity components has dominated the landscape in the past two decades. But recently the definition of “commodity“ in HPC has been morphing. Traditional solutions are routinely augmented by various acceleration technologies, cache-coherent interconnects are becoming mainstream and boutique hardware and software technologies previously reserved for highly specialized solutions are being adopted by major HPC sites at scale.

Developing new and adapting existing highly scalable applications to take advantage of the new technological advances across multiple deployment domains is the greatest challenge facing HPC sites. This is where the operating system can provide

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Microsoft, Red Hat, and HPE Collaboration Delivers Choice & Value to Enterprise Customers

In the world of heterogeneous data centers – having multiple operating systems running on different hardware platforms (and architectures) is the norm.  Even traditional applications and databases are being migrated or abstracted using Java and other interpreted languages to minimize the impact on the end user, if they decide to run on a different platform.

Consider the common scenario where you have both Windows and Linux running in the data center and you need your Linux application to talk to Microsoft SQL Server and get some existing data from it. Your application would need to connect to the Windows server that is running the SQL Server database using one of many available APIs and request information.

While that may sound trivial, in reality you need to: know where that system is located, authenticate your application against it, and pay the penalty of traversing one or more networks to get the data back – all while the user is waiting. This, in fact, was “the way of the world” before Microsoft announced their intent to port MS SQL server to Linux in March of 2016.  Today, however, you have a choice of having your applications connect to a Microsoft SQL Server that runs on either Windows or Linux

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Now Available: QuickStart Cloud Installer (QCI) 1.1

We’re pleased to announce the availability of QuickStart Cloud Installer (QCI) 1.1! This is the second release of QCI since its introduction on September 14, 2016.

Included with both Red Hat Cloud Suite and Red Hat Cloud Infrastructure entitlements, QCI is designed to simplify provisioning your private cloud infrastructure by orchestrating installation workflow across different products. Instead of installing each product in the suite separately, QCI provides an intuitive web-based graphical user interface for provisioning a fully functional cloud using any combination of components in

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Red Hat Enterprise Linux Across Architectures: Everything Works Out of the Box

Since the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server for ARM Development Preview 7.3 became available I’ve been wanting to try it out to see how the existing code for x86_64 systems works on the 64-bit ARM architecture (a.k.a. aarch64).

Going in, I was a bit apprehensive that some kind of heavy lifting would be needed to get things working on the ARM platform. My experience with cross-architecture ports with other distros (before I joined Red Hat) indicated

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PCI Series: Requirement 10 – Track and Monitor All Access to Network Resources and Cardholder Data

This is my last post dedicated to the use of Identity Management (IdM) and related technologies to address the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS). This specific post is related to requirement ten (i.e. the requirement to track and monitor all access to network resources and cardholder data). The outline and mapping of individual articles to the requirements can be found in the overarching post that started the series.

Requirement ten focuses on audit and monitoring. Many components of an IdM-based solution, including client components like

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Container Live Migration Using runC and CRIU

In my previous article I wrote about how it was possible to move from checkpoint/restore to container migration with CRIU. This time I want to write about how to actually migrate a running container from one system to another. In this article I will migrate a runC based container using runC’s built-in CRIU support to checkpoint and restore a container on different hosts.

I have two virtual machines (rhel01 and rhel02) which are hosting my container. My container is running Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 and is located on a shared NFS, which both of my virtual machines have mounted. In addition, I am telling runC to mount the container

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PCI Series: Requirement 8 – Identify and Authenticate Access to System Components

This post continues my series dedicated to the use of Identity Management (IdM) and related technologies to address the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS).  This specific post is related to requirement eight (i.e. the requirement to identify and authenticate access to system components). The outline and mapping of individual articles to requirements can be found in the overarching post that started the series.

Requirement eight is directly related to IdM. IdM can be used to address most of the requirements in this section. IdM stores user accounts, provides user account life-cycle management

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PCI Series: Requirement 7 – Restrict Access to Cardholder Data by Business Need to Know

This is my sixth post dedicated to the use of Identity Management (IdM) and related technologies to address the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS).  This specific post is related to requirement seven (i.e. the requirement to restrict access to cardholder data by business need to know).  The outline and mapping of individual articles to the requirements can be found in the overarching post that started the series.

Section 7 of the PCI DSS standard talks about access control and limiting the privileges of administrative accounts.  IdM can play a big role in addressing these requirements.  IdM provides several key features that are related to access control and privileged account management.  The first one is

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