Announcing Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host 7.2.6

Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host is a small footprint, purpose-built version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux that is designed to run containerized workloads. Building on the success of our last release, Red Hat’s Atomic-OpenShift team is excited to announce the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host 7.2.6. This release features improvements in rpm-ostree, cockpit, skopeo, docker, and the atomic CLI. The full release notes can be found here. This post is going to explore a major new feature

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What’s New in Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host 7.2.5


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It’s been a busy few weeks for us on the Atomic Host team, and we’re excited to announce the release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host 7.2.5! This is a big one too. For those not familiar with our release cadence, we release a new version of Atomic Host every six weeks. This enables us to balance the reliability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux with exciting new features and capabilities from our Project Atomic upstream community in a production ready, supportable manor.

 

Now, let’s walk through some key new features in Atomic Host:

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How Badlock Was Discovered and Fixed

Severity analysis of vulnerabilities by experts from the information security industry is rarely based on real code review. In the ‘Badlock’ case, most read our CVE descriptions and built up a score representing a risk this CVE poses to a user. There is nothing wrong with this approach if it is done correctly.  CVEs are analyzed in isolation; as if no other issue exists. In the case of a ‘Badlock‘ there were eight CVEs. The difference is the fact that one of them was in a foundational component used by most of the code affected by the remaining seven CVEs. That very specific CVE was

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OpenShift Enterprise in Production

In a previous blog post we took a look at the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) and how it can be used to build and deploy applications within a development environment that closely mimics a production OpenShift cluster. In this post, we’ll take an in-depth look at what a production OpenShift cluster looks like — the individual components, their functions, and how they relate to each other. We’ll also check out how OpenShift supports scaling up and scaling out applications in a production environment.

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The Red Hat Ecosystem for Microservice and Container Development

Over the last couple years, microservices and containers have started to redefine the software development landscape. The traditional large Java or C# application has been replaced with multiple smaller components (microservices) which coordinate to provide the required functionality. These microservices typically run inside containers, which provide isolation and portability.

This approach has numerous benefits including being able to scale and replace microservices independently as well as reducing the complexity of individual components. However, it also brings more complexity to the system level; it takes extra effort and tooling to manage and orchestrate the microservices and their interactions.

This post will describe how Red Hat technology and services can be used to develop, deploy and run an effective microservice-based system.

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Looking Back on Containers in 2015

Woah.  2015 went by really quickly.  I do suppose it’s not all that surprising as time flies… especially when you’re having fun or… getting older (you pick).  In fact, we’ve already put 2 percent of 2016 behind us!  That said, before we get too deep into “the future”, and in consideration of Janus having not one but two faces, let’s take a quick trip down memory lane…

Without a doubt, 2015 was an exciting year for all things “container”, especially here at Red Hat.

To recap, the year started off with a bang when we announced the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host alongside Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.1.  Then – less than two months later

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Announcing OpenShift Enterprise 3.1 and Red Hat Atomic Enterprise Platform Public Preview

This morning, Red Hat announced the general availability of OpenShift Enterprise 3.1 as well as a public preview of Red Hat Atomic Enterprise Platform. Red Hat’s updated container offerings are:

  • OpenShift Enterprise 3.1, the latest version of Red Hat’s application platform designed to build, deploy and run stateful and stateless applications on private and public cloud infrastructure.
  • Red Hat Atomic Enterprise Platform Public Preview, an optimized container infrastructure platform for deploying, running and managing containers across the enterprise.

Both enable enterprises to develop, integrate, deploy, and manage a variety of applications consistently across a more secure, container-optimized infrastructure. If you’re looking to adopt container-based architectures, OpenShift and Atomic allow you to use Docker-formatted Linux containers to create microservices-based applications and modernize traditional workloads – all with the security of a consistent foundation based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

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Red Hat Enterprise Linux on Azure? .NET as an RPM and Container from Red Hat? Sweet!

Six years ago, we worked closely with Microsoft to deliver on a significant and widespread customer request: the ability for our respective operating systems to function as guests on each other’s hypervisor. This was then codified by the certification of Hyper-V as a supported hypervisor for use with Red Hat Enterprise Linux and the certification of Red Hat products as supported hypervisors for use with Windows which both companies have maintained for the past six years.

More than half a decade later, customers are now asking Red Hat and Microsoft to have Red Hat Enterprise Linux as a supported guest in the Azure Cloud. We both heard you! Thanks to a deep commitment by both companies, this day has arrived and, together, we are responding to another important customer ask with full support.

As the game show host says, “But wait! there’s more!” In March 2014, we announced that we were bringing Microsoft .NET capabilities to OpenShift Origin. We now expect that Microsoft .NET capabilities will grow past OpenShift Origin to include

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Now Available: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 Beta

In March, we announced the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.1, the first update to our Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 platform.  In addition, we also announced the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host, our first container-optimized host platform. Today, we are pleased to announce the beta availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 beta includes a number of new features and enhancements – while continuing to provide the stability, reliability, and security required to meet the demands of both modern datacenters and next-generation IT environments.

Interested in learning more?  For more information on the beta release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 you can review the release notes in the Red Hat Customer Portal.

Ready to get started?  If you’re an existing Red Hat customer (with an active Red Hat Enterprise Linux subscription), you can access and download Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 beta via the Software & Download Center.