Exploring Red Hat Access Insights

With the release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.7, we’re happy to also announce general availability of Red Hat Access Insights, a new hosted service from Red Hat designed to help customers proactively identify and resolve issues that could impact business operations.

Given the complexity and scale of modern IT environments, we recognize that it can be increasingly complicated to monitor, maintain, and secure enterprise infrastructure.  By tapping into Red Hat’s collective experience

Continue reading “Exploring Red Hat Access Insights”

What’s Next for Containers? User Namespaces

What are user namespaces? Sticking with the apartment complex analogy, the numbering of users and groups have historically been the same in every container and in the underlying host, just like public channel 10 is generally the same in every unit in an apartment building.

But, imagine that people in different apartments are getting their television signal from different cable and satellite companies. Channel 10 is now different for for each person. It might be sports for one person, and news for another.

Historically, in the Linux kernel, there was a single data structure which held users and groups. Starting in kernel version 3.8

Continue reading “What’s Next for Containers? User Namespaces”

Red Hat Directory Server 10 Now Generally Available

Today, we are pleased to announced the general availability of Red Hat Directory Server 10, the latest version of Red Hat’s open source, network-based registry server. Built on the technologies delivered by the 389 Directory Server project, Red Hat Directory Server offers a Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP)-compliant server that centralizes critical application information, simplifies user management and enhances security across an entire organization.

As a tool for building business applications, Red Hat Directory Server provides

Continue reading “Red Hat Directory Server 10 Now Generally Available”

Identity Management and Two-Factor Authentication Using One-Time Passwords

Two-factor authentication, or 2FA, is not something new. It has existed for quite some time and in different forms. What is a ‘factor’? A factor is something you have, something you know, or something you are. For example, if we combine a PIN that you know, with your fingerprint, we get a 2FA based on biometrics. In practice, biometric solutions are not often used because it’s not especially difficult to steal someone’s fingerprint (…and it is quite hard to revoke or replace your finger). The more practical approach to two-factor authentication is to combine something you know, a PIN or password, with something you have.

Something you have often comes in form of

Continue reading “Identity Management and Two-Factor Authentication Using One-Time Passwords”

Red Hat Delivers Leading Application Performance with the Latest Intel Xeon Processors

With every new Intel Xeon processor generation, the benefits typically span beyond simple increases in transistor counts or the number of cores within each processor. Things like increased memory capacity per chip or larger on-chip caches are tangible and measurable, and often have a direct effect on performance, resulting in record-breaking scores on various standard benchmarks.

There is, however, more to every new processor family launch than meets the eye. These new chips often send a ripple of innovation throughout our ecosystem of partners, forcing them to re-evaluate and re-visit existing performance results and break the status quo. The ability to support these partners is of paramount importance to Red Hat and, as a result, Red Hat Enterprise Linux is often being selected by our partners to support their ongoing benchmarking efforts.

Yesterday, Intel launched the Intel Xeon E7 v3 processor family with several new world record industry-standard benchmarks. Red Hat Enterprise Linux was used in nearly one-third of all results. The following table captures these leading results

Continue reading “Red Hat Delivers Leading Application Performance with the Latest Intel Xeon Processors”

Enterprise-Ready Container Orchestration with Kubernetes

Here on the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Blog we’ve dedicated a number of posts to containers and a variety of associated Red Hat solutions.  Whether you’re seeking to deploy Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 applications on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 as containers, hoping to better understand how atomic updates work, or are simply out to learn all you can about Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host – there’s likely a post (here) with the information you need.  However, we’ve yet to really explore container orchestration.  To this end, I invite you to read this new post from Red Hat’s own Joe Fernandes.  Joe talks about Kubernetes, Google’s tool for managing clusters of Linux containers, its progenitor (i.e Google’s Borg), and how Red Hat is building on top of Kubernetes to bring web-scale container infrastructure to enterprise customers.

Understanding the Changes to ‘docker search’ and ‘docker pull’ in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.1

If you’re working with container images on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.1 or Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host, you might have noticed that the search and pull behavior of the included docker tool works slightly differently than it does if you’re working with that of the upstream project. This is intentional.

When we started the planning process for containers in RHEL 7.1, we had 3 goals in mind:

  1. Give control over the search path to the end-user administrator
  2. Enable a federated approach to search and discovery of docker-formatted container images
  3. Support the ability for Red Hat customers to consume container images and other content included as part of their Red Hat Subscription

The changes we implemented, which are documented on the Red Hat Customer Portal, affect three different areas of the tool:

Continue reading “Understanding the Changes to ‘docker search’ and ‘docker pull’ in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.1”

Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host: Updates Made Easy

Earlier in March we announced the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Atomic Host, a small footprint, container host based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. It provides a stable host platform, optimized for running application containers, and brings a number of application software packaging and deployment benefits to customers. In my previous container blog I gave the top seven reasons to deploy Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Atomic Host. One reason was the ability to do atomic updates and rollbacks. In this blog I provide an in-depth look into atomic updating and how it differs from a yum update. And, speaking of atomic updates

Continue reading “Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host: Updates Made Easy”

Live Kernel Patching Update

In the year since I first wrote about kpatch, Red Hat’s live kernel patching project for Linux, we’ve been very busy.  Here are some of the highlights from the last year of live kernel patching development, and some clues about where we may be headed in the future.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Special Interest Group

In 2014, we kicked off a kpatch Special Interest Group (SIG) for users who are interested in trying out kpatch in a Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 environment.  We’ve delivered kpatch fixes for several kernel CVEs, allowing users to easily apply fixes to their kernels immediately with no disruption or reboots necessary.

If you’re a Red Hat Enterprise Linux customer and are interested in joining the kpatch SIG

Continue reading “Live Kernel Patching Update”

Virtual Machines or Containers? Maybe Both?

Over the last 18 months, especially since the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7, “containers” have emerged as a hot topic. With the more recent introduction of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host, an operating system optimized for running the next generation of applications with Linux containers, one might wonder… what about virtualization? In that the benefits of containerization seem to overlap those of traditional virtualization, how do organizations know when to pick one approach over the other?

Continue reading “Virtual Machines or Containers? Maybe Both?”