From Checkpoint/Restore to Container Migration

The concept to save (i.e. checkpoint / dump) the state of a process, at a certain point in time, so that it may later be used to restore / restart the process (to the exact same state) has existed for many years. One of the most prominent motivations to develop and support checkpoint/restore functionality was to provide improved fault tolerance. For example, checkpoint/restore allows for processes to be restored from previously created checkpoints if, for one reason or another, these processes had been aborted.

Over the years there have been several different implementations of checkpoint/restore for Linux. Existing implementations of checkpoint/restore differ in terms of  “what level” (of the operating system) they are operating; the lowest level approaches focus on implementing checkpoint/restore directly in the kernel while other “higher level” approaches implement checkpoint/restore completely in user-space. While it would be difficult to unearth each and every approach /  implementation – it is likely fair to

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When to Migrate: Red Hat Identity Management vs. Third-Party Solutions

Over last several months, in meetings with many Red Hat customers, I have been asked about best practices related to migration from an existing third-party identity management solution to Red Hat’s Identity Management (IdM) solution. In today’s post I will share some of my thoughts on this matter…

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Now Available: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 Beta

In March, we announced the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.1, the first update to our Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 platform.  In addition, we also announced the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host, our first container-optimized host platform. Today, we are pleased to announce the beta availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 beta includes a number of new features and enhancements – while continuing to provide the stability, reliability, and security required to meet the demands of both modern datacenters and next-generation IT environments.

Interested in learning more?  For more information on the beta release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 you can review the release notes in the Red Hat Customer Portal.

Ready to get started?  If you’re an existing Red Hat customer (with an active Red Hat Enterprise Linux subscription), you can access and download Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 beta via the Software & Download Center.

Exploring Red Hat Access Insights

With the release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.7, we’re happy to also announce general availability of Red Hat Access Insights, a new hosted service from Red Hat designed to help customers proactively identify and resolve issues that could impact business operations.

Given the complexity and scale of modern IT environments, we recognize that it can be increasingly complicated to monitor, maintain, and secure enterprise infrastructure.  By tapping into Red Hat’s collective experience

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Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host: Updates Made Easy

Earlier in March we announced the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Atomic Host, a small footprint, container host based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. It provides a stable host platform, optimized for running application containers, and brings a number of application software packaging and deployment benefits to customers. In my previous container blog I gave the top seven reasons to deploy Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Atomic Host. One reason was the ability to do atomic updates and rollbacks. In this blog I provide an in-depth look into atomic updating and how it differs from a yum update. And, speaking of atomic updates

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Active Directory and Identity Management (IdM) Trusts – Exactly Where Are My Users?

As this is my sixth post on Identity Management I thought it would (first) be wise to explain (and link back to) my previous efforts.  My first post kicked off the series by outlining challenges associated with interoperability in the modern enterprise.  My second post explored  how the integration gap between Linux systems and Active Directory emerged, how it was formerly addressed, and what options are available now.  My third post outlined the set of criteria with which one is able to examine various integration options.  And my most recent entries, post four and five, reviewed options for direct and indirect integration, respectively.

Delving deeper into the world of indirect integration (i.e. utilizing a trust-based approach) – two of the biggest questions are often: “Where are my users?” and “Where does authentication actually happen?” As opposed to a solution that relies upon synchronization

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Containerize Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 Applications to Run on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

What if you could run your existing Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 applications on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 without porting or making changes to your source code? Today, we are pleased to announce the immediate availability of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 platform image, which allows for the creation of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6-based application containers. Applications that have been developed, tested, and certified for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 systems can now be deployed as a container and run on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 as a container host.

rhel-6-platform-imageThis new platform image allows customers to

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Final Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Beta Now Available

When Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 was first introduced in 2007, it was done so with an expected seven year lifecycle. Five years later, in 2012, we saw the continued strong adoption of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 and decided to extend its seven year lifecycle to 10 years. Now, in 2014, the original retirement year for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5, we still see an active, dedicated customer base that has come to value this long, predictable lifecycle in addition to the platform’s inherent security, stability, and reliability.

Today, we are pleased to announce beta availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.11. This release continues to provide system administrators with a secure, stable, and reliable platform for their organization’s enterprise applications.

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