We’re changing up our marketing approach. And it involves comic books.

We’re adopting a new marketing mantra for Red Hat Enterprise Linux: Listen. Learn. Build. Which probably doesn’t seem all that revolutionary. That’s pretty much the mantra of open source. But compare that to how tech marketing usually happens.

There’s a lot of building–assets and advertisements and the whole nine yards. But the listening and learning parts usually happen afterwards, if at all.

So we’re making a conscious effort to explicitly apply the principles of open source to the way that we market our flagship open source technology. We’re starting with the listening part.

And who exactly are we listening to? You.

And what exactly are we listening to you talk about? Your OS adventures.

And what exactly do we mean by “OS adventures”?–

–Actually, here’s a better idea. Instead of telling you what we’re doing and why, let’s show you…

Continue reading “We’re changing up our marketing approach. And it involves comic books.”

In Defense of the Pet Container, Part 2: Wrappers, Aggregates and Models… Oh My!

In our first post defending the pet container, we looked at the challenge of complexity facing modern software stacks and one way that containers address this challenge through aggregation. In essence, the Docker “wrapper” consolidates the next level of the stack, much like RPM did at the component level, but aggregation is just the beginning of what the project provides.

If we take a step back and look at the Docker project in context, there are four aspects that contribute to its exceptional popularity:

  1. it simplifies the way users interact with the kernel, for features we have come to call Linux containers;
  2. it’s a tool and format for aggregate packaging of software stacks to be deployed into containers;
  3. it is a model for layering generations of changes on top of each other in a single inheritance model;
  4. it adds a transport for these aggregate packages.

Continue reading “In Defense of the Pet Container, Part 2: Wrappers, Aggregates and Models… Oh My!”

Virtual Machines or Containers? Maybe Both?

Over the last 18 months, especially since the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7, “containers” have emerged as a hot topic. With the more recent introduction of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host, an operating system optimized for running the next generation of applications with Linux containers, one might wonder… what about virtualization? In that the benefits of containerization seem to overlap those of traditional virtualization, how do organizations know when to pick one approach over the other?

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What’s Moving in the World of POWER?

Linux permanently changed the landscape of the datacenter by creating a community approach to rapid innovation. Its introduction and widespread adoption have fueled a shift from closed to open systems, often times providing greater resiliency than other operating environments. Commodity x86 architectures are only one slice of a much larger market for reliable open source enterprise-class systems – and Linux has for many years been a cross-platform operating system. For example, did you know that Red Hat Enterprise Linux also runs on IBM’s Power Systems (POWER) and z Systems architectures? These options give IT organizations flexibility with respect to hardware for workloads and use cases ranging from big data analytics to cloud computing. Ensuring that Red Hat Enterprise Linux runs on IBM’s Power Systems and z Systems architectures gives our customers a broad range of application and deployment choices.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux for Power and Red Hat Enterprise Linux for System z are built

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Performance Testing Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Atomic Host Beta on Amazon EC2

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Atomic Host Beta is an operating platform that is optimized and minimized to run containers. It packages key components of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 such as SELinux, systemd, and tuned with the kernel to facilitate running containers in a secure and optimized manner. It also offers Kubernetes and Docker to facilitate the rapid creation, deployment, and orchestration of containers – simplifying the life cycle management of applications and systems.

Containers allow users to put application and all of their runtime dependencies into secure packages that are both easy to deploy and easy to manage. Containers are also portable and images of a given container can be copied and replicated to other systems. Since containers are isolated from each other and are isolated from the host OS, libraries and application binaries can be updated individually without affecting other containers or the host OS (and vice versa).

The following video (below) mirrors the demo as presented

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Regarding the Importance of Quality, Trust, and Certifications

Last Thursday’s post directed you to the Red Hat Blog where we underscored why the operating system remains vitally important.  In this related companion piece we’re reminded why quality, a chain of trust, and certifications are integral to enterprise-grade products.  In fact, building upon Red Hat Enterprise Linux helps to ensure that your IT infrastructure (everything from software-defined storage to application containerization to OpenStack solutions) benefits from the same trusted technology pool and serves as an optimized stack.  Click here to learn more.

The Operating System: Pervasive, Ubiquitous, and Critical

Applications, virtual machines, containers… what do they all have in common?  They each operate on top of the solid foundation that is the operating system.  In fact, in a world where the pace of technological change is unrelenting, where change is perhaps the only constant, there will always be a need for a reliable platform to build upon.  Has the operating system become a modern day utility?  Find out here.

Red Hat Unveils Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

Six months ago we announced the beta availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. Two months ago, at Red Hat Summit 2014, we announced the availability of a release candidate for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. All the while we have been validating what’s new, different, and exciting about what Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 has to offer – including:

Today we are pleased to announce the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7, the latest major release of our flagship platform. As stated in this morning’s press release:

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