Red Hat Enterprise Linux on Azure? .NET as an RPM and Container from Red Hat? Sweet!

Six years ago, we worked closely with Microsoft to deliver on a significant and widespread customer request: the ability for our respective operating systems to function as guests on each other’s hypervisor. This was then codified by the certification of Hyper-V as a supported hypervisor for use with Red Hat Enterprise Linux and the certification of Red Hat products as supported hypervisors for use with Windows which both companies have maintained for the past six years.

More than half a decade later, customers are now asking Red Hat and Microsoft to have Red Hat Enterprise Linux as a supported guest in the Azure Cloud. We both heard you! Thanks to a deep commitment by both companies, this day has arrived and, together, we are responding to another important customer ask with full support.

As the game show host says, “But wait! there’s more!” In March 2014, we announced that we were bringing Microsoft .NET capabilities to OpenShift Origin. We now expect that Microsoft .NET capabilities will grow past OpenShift Origin to include

Continue reading “Red Hat Enterprise Linux on Azure? .NET as an RPM and Container from Red Hat? Sweet!”

See You at ContainerCon in Seattle

If you’re looking at running Linux containers, you should be heading to ContainerCon in Seattle next week. Co-located with LinuxCon and CloudOpen, ContainerCon is where leading contributors in Linux containers, the Linux kernel, and related projects will get together to educate the community on containers and related innovations.

Red Hatters are contributing to over 40 seContainerConssions on this year’s agenda, including a keynote from Red Hat VP of Engineering Matt Hicks. In “Revolutionizing Application Delivery with Linux and Containers,” Matt will focus on how Linux containers are changing the way that companies develop, consume and manage applications and will emphasize how open source communities and projects like Docker and Kubernetes are delivering this next wave of enterprise application architecture.

If you’re attending ContainerCon, check out Matt’s keynote and some of the sessions below:

Continue reading “See You at ContainerCon in Seattle”

Announcing “Yum + RPM for Containerized Applications” — Nulecule & Atomic App

The promise of Docker is that it simplifies application deployment, allows greater application density on hosts, and features a portable format that offers unparalleled flexibility over standard packaging. But one thing Docker doesn’t get you is the simplicity of `yum install foo` to install an application. Nor can Docker define or process a directed graph of container orchestration dependencies. We aim to change that.

Continue reading “Announcing “Yum + RPM for Containerized Applications” — Nulecule & Atomic App”

RSA Security Conference 2015 in Review: Three Observations

As many specialists in the security world know – the RSA Security Conference is one of the biggest security conferences in North America. This year it was once again held in San Francisco at the Moscone Center. Every year the conference gets bigger and bigger, bringing in more and more people and companies from all over the world.

If you attended – you may have noticed that Red Hat had a booth this year. Located in the corner of the main expo floor (not far from some of the “big guys” like: IBM, Microsoft, EMC, CA Technologies, and Oracle) we were in a great location – receiving no shortage of traffic.  In fact, despite staffing the booth with six Red Hatters we didn’t have any “down time” –  everyone seemed to be interested in what Red Hat has to offer in security.

Over the course of the conference I made a few interesting observations…

Continue reading “RSA Security Conference 2015 in Review: Three Observations”

Shaping the Performance of a Linux Distro: Inside Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

Backstory

Red Hat’s Performance Engineering team is responsible for the performance of many of Red Hat’s products.  We cover existing products such as Red Hat Enterprise Linux, OpenStack Platform, OpenShift and Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization, as well as newer products like Ceph and CloudForms.

Although these days we contribute extensively to Red Hat’s cloud offerings, Red Hat Enterprise Linux remains a core responsibility as the building block for our ecosystem of customers and partners, plus much of Red Hat’s growing product portfolio.

Prior to beginning efforts on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 in earnest

Continue reading “Shaping the Performance of a Linux Distro: Inside Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7”

Top 3 Reasons to Run Container-Based Applications on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

As product manager for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7, part of my job is to ensure that the latest version of our flagship product adheres to our promise of stability, reliability, and security.  In addition, as Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 is Red Hat’s latest enterprise Linux platform, it also needs to incorporate new innovations in technology to help our customers gain business advantage, reduce costs, and increase efficiency without compromising their existing investments. With this in mind, the Red Hat Enterprise Linux team takes great care in evaluating new technology to ensure that it is introduced in a manner that is minimally intrusive (if at all) and is a natural fit for the platform. Support for Linux containers and the ability to host container-based applications are great examples of this and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 stands ready for the challenge.

Creating and operating application containers via process isolation is not a new concept. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 sowed the seeds for this way back in 2010 with the introduction of Control Groups (cgroups). Since that time there have been many exciting developments in this area with active participation from Red Hat. Building upon cgroups functionality, enhancements to the kernel combined with an easy-to-use container format (Docker) make now an opportune time to consider deploying container-based applications on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.

Here are the top three reasons to consider Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 as the host for your container-based applications

Continue reading “Top 3 Reasons to Run Container-Based Applications on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7”

How Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host Powers OpenShift Online

The OpenShift Online Technical Operations team was looking forward to the beta availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host. In fact, they participated in early sprints as part of the Atomic Special Interest Group (SIG) to help make sure Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host had the operational “beef” to stand high alongside Red Hat’s other enterprise products. Part of this process led to us running the unreleased bits in OpenShift Online prior to the beta announcement.

That said, we’re not using it to run some corner niche of our infrastructure. Instead, we are using the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host + Docker combo to run our reverse proxy tier. This means that every API, www.openshift.com, and web console request made to OpenShift Online runs through this tier.

So why all the interest? The small size of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host is the

Continue reading “How Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host Powers OpenShift Online”

Top 7 Reasons to Use Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host

In November we announced Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Atomic Host Public Beta, a small footprint, container host based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.  It provides a stable host platform, optimized for running application containers, and brings a number of application software packaging and deployment benefits to customers.

What are the top 7 reasons to deploy containers on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Atomic Host?

Continue reading “Top 7 Reasons to Use Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host”

Containers: Stumbling on the Road to Utopia

Applications don’t always work as expected, and “it works fine on my machine” — the first line of response when reporting an issue — has been around for decades. One way to avoid the challenge of application issues in production is to maintain identical environments for development, testing, and production. Another is to create a Continuous Integration environment, where code is compiled and deployed to test machines and vetted with each and every code check-in, long before being pushed to production.

Enter containers.

Continue reading “Containers: Stumbling on the Road to Utopia”

AWS re:Invent Bootcamp Attendees Learn How to Accelerate Development with Linux Containers

Developers and system administrators need better ways to deliver applications with increased speed and flexibility. Linux Containers, when used as an open source application packaging and delivery technology, meet this need by combining lightweight application isolation with the flexibility of an image-based deployment method. Red Hat has been working hard to make container technologies safer and easier to consume for the enterprise. Yesterday, at AWS re:Invent, we continued to make progress by offering attendees a chance to dive deep and develop skills for working with containers on AWS at a technical bootcamp.

Red Hat N. Harrison Ripps walks attendees through the do's and don'ts  of Kubernetes
Red Hat’s N. Harrison Ripps walks attendees through the do’s and don’ts of Kubernetes.

This full-day, in-person training session provided a chance for developers and system administrators to learn first-hand from Red Hat knowledge experts and gain skills to deploy container-based applications with AWS. Content included instructor-led presentations and practical exercises, with several hands-on labs.

Through a series of labs

Continue reading “AWS re:Invent Bootcamp Attendees Learn How to Accelerate Development with Linux Containers”