Red Hat at DockerCon 16 in Seattle

If you’re heading to DockerCon 16 next week in Seattle, connect with us to see why Fortune 500 organizations trust Red Hat for enterprise deployments. Red Hat subject matter experts will be onsite to walk you through real-world use cases for securely developing, deploying and managing container-based applications. 

Attend the State of Container Security Session

Join two of Red Hat’s Docker contributors discussing the state of container security today. Senior Software Engineer Mrunal Patel and Thomas Cameron, Global Evangelist of Emerging Technology are presenting on how you can secure your containerized microservices without slowing down development.

Continue reading “Red Hat at DockerCon 16 in Seattle”

What’s Next for Containers? User Namespaces

What are user namespaces? Sticking with the apartment complex analogy, the numbering of users and groups have historically been the same in every container and in the underlying host, just like public channel 10 is generally the same in every unit in an apartment building.

But, imagine that people in different apartments are getting their television signal from different cable and satellite companies. Channel 10 is now different for for each person. It might be sports for one person, and news for another.

Historically, in the Linux kernel, there was a single data structure which held users and groups. Starting in kernel version 3.8

Continue reading “What’s Next for Containers? User Namespaces”

How Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host Powers OpenShift Online

The OpenShift Online Technical Operations team was looking forward to the beta availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host. In fact, they participated in early sprints as part of the Atomic Special Interest Group (SIG) to help make sure Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host had the operational “beef” to stand high alongside Red Hat’s other enterprise products. Part of this process led to us running the unreleased bits in OpenShift Online prior to the beta announcement.

That said, we’re not using it to run some corner niche of our infrastructure. Instead, we are using the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host + Docker combo to run our reverse proxy tier. This means that every API, www.openshift.com, and web console request made to OpenShift Online runs through this tier.

So why all the interest? The small size of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host is the

Continue reading “How Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host Powers OpenShift Online”