Overview of Direct Integration Options

As mentioned in my previous post there are multiple ways to connect a Linux system to Active Directory (AD) directly. With this in mind, let us review the following list of options…

  • The legacy integration option: this is a solution where (likely older) native Linux tools are used to connect to an LDAP server of your choice (e.g. AD).
  • The traditional integration option: this is a solution based on Samba winbind.
  • The third-party integration option: this is a solution based on (proprietary) commercial software.
  • The contemporary integration option: this is a solution based on SSSD.

Legacy Integration Option

In the case of the legacy integration option (see figure above), a Linux system is connected to AD using LDAP for identity lookup and LDAP or Kerberos for authentication. It pretty much solves the problem of basic user authentication. That said, such a solution has the following significant limitations:

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Closing the Integration Gap

This post is the second in a series of blog posts about integrating Linux systems into Active Directory environments. In the previous post we discussed dishwashers and, more seriously, some basic principles. In this post I will continue by exploring how the integration gap between Linux systems and Active Directory emerged, how it was formerly addressed, and what options are available now.

Let’s start with a bit of history… before the advent of Active Directory, Linux and UNIX systems had developed ways to connect to, and interact with, a central LDAP server for identity look-up and authentication purposes. These connections were basic, but as the environments were not overly complex (in comparison to modern equivalents) – they were good enough for the time. Then… AD was born.

Active Directory not only integrated several services (namely: LDAP, Kerberos, and DNS) under one hood, but it also

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An Introduction to Interoperability Challenges in the Modern Enterprise

Have you ever purchased a new dishwasher? For those of you who have, you know that the dishes don’t get washed until your “purchase” is picked-up/delivered, the old dishwasher is removed, and the new unit is hooked-up. In fact, until the new dishwasher is hooked-up, it simply doesn’t work. The dishwasher can be smart, stylish, noiseless, and/or energy-efficient… but none of this matters if it’s not properly connected. At the end of the day, if you want to enjoy the luxury of automatic dish washing, one thing is clear: your new dishwasher needs to be hooked-up.

The act of hooking-up a dishwasher is not unlike adding a Linux system to an existing enterprise IT environment. When you deploy a Linux system, it too needs to be “hooked-up”. As the data that flows through your environment consists of different kinds of objects (e.g. users, groups, hosts, and services) the associated identity information is not unlike the water in your dishwasher. Without this identity information

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Red Hat Enterprise Linux: The Leading Platform for Top-Tier Performance

Since its introduction more than a decade ago, Red Hat Enterprise Linux has become the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform. Along the way it has set the industry standard for performance as most recently demonstrated by Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 delivering multiple world record-breaking benchmark results at launch. These results showcased close collaboration between Red Hat and our ecosystem of partners.

With history as a backdrop, it should come as no surprise that many of our partners rely on Red Hat Enterprise Linux to support their ongoing benchmarking efforts. Red Hat and Intel have enjoyed a long history of collaboration across a full spectrum of all that is enterprise IT – covering everything from applications running on physical servers to virtualized and cloud-based deployments. In fact, during yesterday’s launch of the Intel Xeon E5-2600 v3 processor family

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Red Hat Enterprise Linux: Beyond the World Records

In a recent post, we reviewed the 10 world record results set by Red Hat Enterprise Linux on the Intel Xeon processor E7 v2 family.  Besides showcasing the extreme capabilities of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, these performance achievements tell another compelling story – Red Hat Enterprise Linux has become an exceedingly popular choice when it comes to tough workloads.

For example, consider the share of Red Hat Enterprise Linux versus other operating systems used to produce these records. Out of 20 world record benchmark results (22 total submissions, 3 results were tied) posted by eight different OEM partners at the Intel Xeon processor E7 v2 family announcement, Red Hat Enterprise Linux was used in 12. Seventy-five percent of the hardware vendors taking part in this process chose to publish their world record benchmarks on the new family of processors using Red Hat Enterprise Linux. The chart below shows the significance of this adoption.

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Is Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Beta “The 7th Guest”?

Someone out there “gets” the title, right?  No, I’m not suggesting that Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Beta is an interactive puzzle adventure game. The relationship, I suppose, is in fact based on a much looser association: this is our seventh major release and this post (as opposed to my first) is dedicated to Red Hat Enterprise Linux running as a guest on third party hypervisors.

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KVM Virtualization: Refining the Virtual World with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Beta

Ever since Red Hat Enterprise Linux added KVM Virtualization as a kernel-based hypervisor to run virtual machines (way back in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.4), the operating system took on a dual personality.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux became both a Virtualization host for high density virtual data centers / cloud service platforms, and a guest operating system running on third party hypervisors such as VMware vSphere and Microsoft Hyper-V. As the topic is sufficiently broad, I plan to split my discussion of virtualization into two posts.

Today’s post will discuss Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 beta as a hypervisor using KVM Virtualization technology and it will highlight a few key enhancements that make Red Hat Enterprise Linux the operating system of choice for modern hybrid data centers. While the features that I will review are inherently those that I find to be the most exciting (note: I’m hoping you will find them to be exciting and useful as well), a complete list is available in the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 beta release notes.

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