Container Migration Around The World

In this article I want to talk about a runC container which I want to migrate around the world while clients stay connected to the application.

In my previous Checkpoint/Restore In Userspace (CRIU) articles I introduced CRIU (From Checkpoint/Restore to Container Migration) and in the follow-up I gave an example how to use it in combination with containers (Container Live Migration Using runC and CRIU). Recently Christian Horn published an additional article about CRIU which is also a good starting point.

In my container I am running Xonotic. Xonotic calls itself ‘The Free and Fast Arena Shooter’. The part that is running in the container is the server part of the game to which multiple clients can connect to play together. In this article the client is running on my local system while the server and its container is live migrated around the world.

This article also gives detailed background information about 

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Virtual Machines or Containers? Maybe Both?

Over the last 18 months, especially since the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7, “containers” have emerged as a hot topic. With the more recent introduction of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host, an operating system optimized for running the next generation of applications with Linux containers, one might wonder… what about virtualization? In that the benefits of containerization seem to overlap those of traditional virtualization, how do organizations know when to pick one approach over the other?

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KVM Virtualization: Refining the Virtual World with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Beta

Ever since Red Hat Enterprise Linux added KVM Virtualization as a kernel-based hypervisor to run virtual machines (way back in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.4), the operating system took on a dual personality.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux became both a Virtualization host for high density virtual data centers / cloud service platforms, and a guest operating system running on third party hypervisors such as VMware vSphere and Microsoft Hyper-V. As the topic is sufficiently broad, I plan to split my discussion of virtualization into two posts.

Today’s post will discuss Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 beta as a hypervisor using KVM Virtualization technology and it will highlight a few key enhancements that make Red Hat Enterprise Linux the operating system of choice for modern hybrid data centers. While the features that I will review are inherently those that I find to be the most exciting (note: I’m hoping you will find them to be exciting and useful as well), a complete list is available in the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 beta release notes.

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