Aspects of Integration

In my previous post I reviewed the trends related to the integration of Linux systems into environments managed by Active Directory (AD). In this post I will review two integration options, namely: direct integration and indirect integration.

The direct option is, not surprisingly, when your systems are integrated into AD directly (i.e. your Linux systems communicate directly with AD), while the indirect option leverages an intermediary server (see figure below).

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Closing the Integration Gap

This post is the second in a series of blog posts about integrating Linux systems into Active Directory environments. In the previous post we discussed dishwashers and, more seriously, some basic principles. In this post I will continue by exploring how the integration gap between Linux systems and Active Directory emerged, how it was formerly addressed, and what options are available now.

Let’s start with a bit of history… before the advent of Active Directory, Linux and UNIX systems had developed ways to connect to, and interact with, a central LDAP server for identity look-up and authentication purposes. These connections were basic, but as the environments were not overly complex (in comparison to modern equivalents) – they were good enough for the time. Then… AD was born.

Active Directory not only integrated several services (namely: LDAP, Kerberos, and DNS) under one hood, but it also

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An Introduction to Interoperability Challenges in the Modern Enterprise

Have you ever purchased a new dishwasher? For those of you who have, you know that the dishes don’t get washed until your “purchase” is picked-up/delivered, the old dishwasher is removed, and the new unit is hooked-up. In fact, until the new dishwasher is hooked-up, it simply doesn’t work. The dishwasher can be smart, stylish, noiseless, and/or energy-efficient… but none of this matters if it’s not properly connected. At the end of the day, if you want to enjoy the luxury of automatic dish washing, one thing is clear: your new dishwasher needs to be hooked-up.

The act of hooking-up a dishwasher is not unlike adding a Linux system to an existing enterprise IT environment. When you deploy a Linux system, it too needs to be “hooked-up”. As the data that flows through your environment consists of different kinds of objects (e.g. users, groups, hosts, and services) the associated identity information is not unlike the water in your dishwasher. Without this identity information

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Mysteries of NUMA Memory Management Revealed

The memory subsystem is one of the most critical components of modern server systems–it supplies critical run-time data and instructions to applications and to the operating system. Red Hat Enterprise Linux provides a number of tools for managing memory. This post illustrates how you can use these tools to boost the performance of systems with NUMA topologies.

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How Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host Powers OpenShift Online

The OpenShift Online Technical Operations team was looking forward to the beta availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host. In fact, they participated in early sprints as part of the Atomic Special Interest Group (SIG) to help make sure Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host had the operational “beef” to stand high alongside Red Hat’s other enterprise products. Part of this process led to us running the unreleased bits in OpenShift Online prior to the beta announcement.

That said, we’re not using it to run some corner niche of our infrastructure. Instead, we are using the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host + Docker combo to run our reverse proxy tier. This means that every API, www.openshift.com, and web console request made to OpenShift Online runs through this tier.

So why all the interest? The small size of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host is the

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Precision Time Synchronization & Network Latency

In the second installment of “what’s new” for networking features in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7, I’d like to shift the focus and spend some time talking about improvements to network time synchronization and enhancements in the network stack designed to reduce latency.  Note that the previous installment of this two part series was posted during the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 beta; now that Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 is generally available I encourage customers to visit the Red Hat Customer Portal, download this latest release, and to let me know what you think.

Highly Accurate Time Synchronization

Precise time synchronization with microsecond or nanosecond accuracy is increasingly critical to the success of many high-speed, low-latency applications. Whether tracking time on trading transactions or market feeds, improving the time stamp accuracy on archived data, or administration-free time synchronization of servers within a rack (or around the world) for automation or regulatory purposes, precision time synchronization is a key enabler for delivering better performance.

New to Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7,

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Final Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Beta Now Available

When Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 was first introduced in 2007, it was done so with an expected seven year lifecycle. Five years later, in 2012, we saw the continued strong adoption of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 and decided to extend its seven year lifecycle to 10 years. Now, in 2014, the original retirement year for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5, we still see an active, dedicated customer base that has come to value this long, predictable lifecycle in addition to the platform’s inherent security, stability, and reliability.

Today, we are pleased to announce beta availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.11. This release continues to provide system administrators with a secure, stable, and reliable platform for their organization’s enterprise applications.

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Red Hat Unveils Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

Six months ago we announced the beta availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. Two months ago, at Red Hat Summit 2014, we announced the availability of a release candidate for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. All the while we have been validating what’s new, different, and exciting about what Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 has to offer – including:

Today we are pleased to announce the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7, the latest major release of our flagship platform. As stated in this morning’s press release:

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Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Release Candidate & Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host

For those not attending Red Hat Summit 2014 or not tracking the latest news and updates (available on the official Red Hat Summit Blog), you may have missed two important and exciting announcements, namely:

  • A Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Release Candidate (RC) will be made publicly available (starting next week).  As a pre-release build of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 RC offers a near-final look at the only operating system crafted for the open hybrid cloud, building upon the feedback collected during the beta program for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.
  • Also, Red Hat plans to introduce Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host as a new addition to the Red Hat Enterprise Linux family.  Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host couples the flexible, lightweight and modular capabilities of Linux Containers with the reliability and security of Red Hat Enterprise Linux in a reduced image size that will enable easy movement of Red Hat Enterprise Linux-certified applications across bare metal systems, virtual machines and private and public clouds.

For more information on either the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 RC or our plans for Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host – I encourage you to visit: press.redhat.com