Introducing the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Base Image

We’re excited to announce our latest step in the further optimizing of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) for containers with the release of the RHEL Atomic base image. This image is much smaller than the current RHEL base image, giving just enough to get started on building your application or service.

We carved out python, systemd, and yes, even Yum is gone – leaving you with only the bare bone essentials like glibc, rpm, bash, and their remaining dependencies. This leaves us with an image that’s just under 30MB compressed, 75MB on disk; composed of 81 packages.

Continue reading “Introducing the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Base Image”

.NET Core on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

In November 2015, I blogged about the announcement to bring .NET to RHEL from the .NET Core upstream project to enterprise customers and developers, both as an RPM and as a Linux container.  That was quite a moment for the industry and, quite frankly, for me as well, having participated in the discussions that led to the significant announcement with Microsoft.  Since then, we have been in tight collaboration to make sure this day would actually arrive.  Despite the usual challenges with a relatively new open source project, the project was

Continue reading “.NET Core on Red Hat Enterprise Linux”

In Defense of the Pet Container, Part 1: Prelude – The Only Constant is Complexity

It’s been just over three years since Solomon Hykes presented the world with the (so far) most creative way to use the tar command: the Docker project. Not only does the project combine existing container-technologies and make them easier to use, but its well-timed introduction drove an unprecedented rate of adoption for new technology.

Did people run containers before the Docker project? Yes, but it was harder to do so. The broader community was favoring LXC, and Red Hat was working on a libvirt-based model for Red Hat Enterprise Linux. With OpenShift 2, Red Hat had already been running containers in production for several years – both in an online PaaS as well as on-premise for enterprise customers. The model pre-Docker however was fundamentally different from what we are seeing today: rather than enabling completely independent runtimes inside the containers, the approach in

Continue reading “In Defense of the Pet Container, Part 1: Prelude – The Only Constant is Complexity”