Keeping pace with multiple architectures (Part 2)

In our first post of discussing Red Hat’s multi-architecture strategy, we focused on the disruptive nature of enabling new and rapidly-evolving architectures and how this enablement necessitates a different set of product requirements to fulfill our vision of providing a consistent and familiar experience to our customers across multiple hardware architectures. While we have been working with many original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) on x86_64-based servers for years, we have seen interest from our customer base in delivering parity across multiple architectures, including IBM Power Little Endian (ppc64le) and ARMv8-A (aarch64).

So what exactly are we doing with our partners to make this 

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What’s Moving in the World of POWER?

Linux permanently changed the landscape of the datacenter by creating a community approach to rapid innovation. Its introduction and widespread adoption have fueled a shift from closed to open systems, often times providing greater resiliency than other operating environments. Commodity x86 architectures are only one slice of a much larger market for reliable open source enterprise-class systems – and Linux has for many years been a cross-platform operating system. For example, did you know that Red Hat Enterprise Linux also runs on IBM’s Power Systems (POWER) and z Systems architectures? These options give IT organizations flexibility with respect to hardware for workloads and use cases ranging from big data analytics to cloud computing. Ensuring that Red Hat Enterprise Linux runs on IBM’s Power Systems and z Systems architectures gives our customers a broad range of application and deployment choices.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux for Power and Red Hat Enterprise Linux for System z are built

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