rkt, appc, and Docker: A Take on the Linux Container Upstream

At this week’s CoreOS Fest in San Francisco, CoreOS is – unsurprisingly – pushing hard on the Application Container Spec (appc) and its first implementation, rkt, making it the topic of the first session after the keynote and a bold story about broad adoption.

When making technology decisions, Red Hat continuously evaluates all available options with the goal of selecting the best technologies that are supported by upstream communities. This is why Red Hat is engaging upstream in appc to actively contribute to the specification.

Red Hat engages in many upstream communities.  However, this engagement should not imply full support, or that we consider appc or rkt ready for

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Webcast Tomorrow: Top 6 Misconceptions about Linux Containers

Linux containers have been getting a lot of hype recently, and it’s easy to understand why. Delivering applications to meet the demands of the businesIcon_RH_Object_Clipboard-Checklist-A_RGB_Buttons is challenging and containers are disrupting traditional application development and deployment models, enabling businesses to explore new, better ways to deliver products and services.

New innovations like the Docker image format and Kubernetes give you a simpler way to quickly create, package, assemble, and distribute applications. But with hype comes misunderstandings and misconceptions.

Join Red Hat and Cisco tomorrow, May 5, 2015 at 11:00 AM ET / 8:00 AM PT for the webcast, Top 6 Misconceptions about Linux Containers, to gain clarity around these misconceptions. In the webcast, you will:

  • Gain a pragmatic look at Linux containers.
  • Understand what benefits containers can deliver for you.
  • Discover what security, implementation, and other considerations you should understand before your organization embraces this technology.

If you haven’t already done so, register today.

Understanding the Changes to ‘docker search’ and ‘docker pull’ in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.1

If you’re working with container images on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.1 or Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host, you might have noticed that the search and pull behavior of the included docker tool works slightly differently than it does if you’re working with that of the upstream project. This is intentional.

When we started the planning process for containers in RHEL 7.1, we had 3 goals in mind:

  1. Give control over the search path to the end-user administrator
  2. Enable a federated approach to search and discovery of docker-formatted container images
  3. Support the ability for Red Hat customers to consume container images and other content included as part of their Red Hat Subscription

The changes we implemented, which are documented on the Red Hat Customer Portal, affect three different areas of the tool:

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Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host: Updates Made Easy

Earlier in March we announced the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Atomic Host, a small footprint, container host based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. It provides a stable host platform, optimized for running application containers, and brings a number of application software packaging and deployment benefits to customers. In my previous container blog I gave the top seven reasons to deploy Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Atomic Host. One reason was the ability to do atomic updates and rollbacks. In this blog I provide an in-depth look into atomic updating and how it differs from a yum update. And, speaking of atomic updates

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Top 3 Reasons to Run Container-Based Applications on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

As product manager for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7, part of my job is to ensure that the latest version of our flagship product adheres to our promise of stability, reliability, and security.  In addition, as Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 is Red Hat’s latest enterprise Linux platform, it also needs to incorporate new innovations in technology to help our customers gain business advantage, reduce costs, and increase efficiency without compromising their existing investments. With this in mind, the Red Hat Enterprise Linux team takes great care in evaluating new technology to ensure that it is introduced in a manner that is minimally intrusive (if at all) and is a natural fit for the platform. Support for Linux containers and the ability to host container-based applications are great examples of this and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 stands ready for the challenge.

Creating and operating application containers via process isolation is not a new concept. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 sowed the seeds for this way back in 2010 with the introduction of Control Groups (cgroups). Since that time there have been many exciting developments in this area with active participation from Red Hat. Building upon cgroups functionality, enhancements to the kernel combined with an easy-to-use container format (Docker) make now an opportune time to consider deploying container-based applications on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.

Here are the top three reasons to consider Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 as the host for your container-based applications

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How Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host Powers OpenShift Online

The OpenShift Online Technical Operations team was looking forward to the beta availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host. In fact, they participated in early sprints as part of the Atomic Special Interest Group (SIG) to help make sure Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host had the operational “beef” to stand high alongside Red Hat’s other enterprise products. Part of this process led to us running the unreleased bits in OpenShift Online prior to the beta announcement.

That said, we’re not using it to run some corner niche of our infrastructure. Instead, we are using the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host + Docker combo to run our reverse proxy tier. This means that every API, www.openshift.com, and web console request made to OpenShift Online runs through this tier.

So why all the interest? The small size of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host is the

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Containers: Stumbling on the Road to Utopia

Applications don’t always work as expected, and “it works fine on my machine” — the first line of response when reporting an issue — has been around for decades. One way to avoid the challenge of application issues in production is to maintain identical environments for development, testing, and production. Another is to create a Continuous Integration environment, where code is compiled and deployed to test machines and vetted with each and every code check-in, long before being pushed to production.

Enter containers.

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Linux Containers: Why They’re in Your Future and What Has to Happen First

Several weeks ago Red Hat and Cisco collaborated on a whitepaper for IT leaders and industry analysts on Linux containers.  The following is an excerpt from the first page:

“Linux containers and Docker are poised to radically change the way applications are built, shipped, deployed, and instantiated. They accelerate application delivery by making it easy to package applications along with their dependencies. As a result, the same containerized application can operate in different development, test, and production environments. The platform can be a physical server, virtual server, public cloud, or network device.”

Interested in reading more?  Click

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Performance Testing Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Atomic Host Beta on Amazon EC2

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Atomic Host Beta is an operating platform that is optimized and minimized to run containers. It packages key components of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 such as SELinux, systemd, and tuned with the kernel to facilitate running containers in a secure and optimized manner. It also offers Kubernetes and Docker to facilitate the rapid creation, deployment, and orchestration of containers – simplifying the life cycle management of applications and systems.

Containers allow users to put application and all of their runtime dependencies into secure packages that are both easy to deploy and easy to manage. Containers are also portable and images of a given container can be copied and replicated to other systems. Since containers are isolated from each other and are isolated from the host OS, libraries and application binaries can be updated individually without affecting other containers or the host OS (and vice versa).

The following video (below) mirrors the demo as presented

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