Red Hat at DockerCon 16 in Seattle

If you’re heading to DockerCon 16 next week in Seattle, connect with us to see why Fortune 500 organizations trust Red Hat for enterprise deployments. Red Hat subject matter experts will be onsite to walk you through real-world use cases for securely developing, deploying and managing container-based applications. 

Attend the State of Container Security Session

Join two of Red Hat’s Docker contributors discussing the state of container security today. Senior Software Engineer Mrunal Patel and Thomas Cameron, Global Evangelist of Emerging Technology are presenting on how you can secure your containerized microservices without slowing down development.

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In Defense of the Pet Container, Part 1: Prelude – The Only Constant is Complexity

It’s been just over three years since Solomon Hykes presented the world with the (so far) most creative way to use the tar command: the Docker project. Not only does the project combine existing container-technologies and make them easier to use, but its well-timed introduction drove an unprecedented rate of adoption for new technology.

Did people run containers before the Docker project? Yes, but it was harder to do so. The broader community was favoring LXC, and Red Hat was working on a libvirt-based model for Red Hat Enterprise Linux. With OpenShift 2, Red Hat had already been running containers in production for several years – both in an online PaaS as well as on-premise for enterprise customers. The model pre-Docker however was fundamentally different from what we are seeing today: rather than enabling completely independent runtimes inside the containers, the approach in

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Architecting Containers Part 5: Building a Secure and Manageable Container Software Supply Chain

Background

In Architecting Containers Part 4: Workload Characteristics and Candidates for Containerization we investigated the level of effort necessary to containerize different types of workloads. In this article I am going to address several challenges facing organizations that are deploying containers – how to patch containers and how to determine which teams are responsible for the container images. Should they be controlled by development or operations?

In addition, we are going to take a look at

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Architecting Containers Part 4: Workload Characteristics and Candidates for Containerization

Many development and operations teams are looking for guidelines to help them determine what applications can be containerized and how difficult it may be. In Architecting Containers Part 3: How the User Space Affects Your Applications we took an in depth look at how the user space affects applications for both developers and operations. In this article we are going to take a look at workload characteristics and the level of effort required to containerize different types of applications.

The goal of this article is to provide guidance based on current capabilities and best practices within

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Continuous Delivery / Deployment with OpenShift Enterprise

In our previous posts, we’ve explored the Red Hat container ecosystem, the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK), OpenShift as a local deployment and OpenShift in production. In this final post of the series, we’re going to take a look at how a team can take advantage of the advanced features of OpenShift in order to automatically move new versions of applications from development to production — a process known as Continuous Delivery (or Continuous Deployment, depending on the level of automation).

OpenShift supports

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OpenShift Enterprise in Production

In a previous blog post we took a look at the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) and how it can be used to build and deploy applications within a development environment that closely mimics a production OpenShift cluster. In this post, we’ll take an in-depth look at what a production OpenShift cluster looks like — the individual components, their functions, and how they relate to each other. We’ll also check out how OpenShift supports scaling up and scaling out applications in a production environment.

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Container Tidbits: When Should I Break My Application into Multiple Containers?

There is a lot of confusion around which pieces of your application you should break into multiple containers and why. I recently responded to this thread on the Docker user mailing list which led me to writing today’s post. In this post I plan to examine an imaginary Java application that historically ran on a single Tomcat server and to explain why I would break it apart into separate containers. In an attempt to make things interesting – I will also aim to

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Test Driving OpenShift with the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK)

Setting up a local development environment that corresponds as close as possible to production can be a time-consuming and error-prone task. However, for OpenShift deployments, we have the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) which does a good job at solving this and also provides a great environment for experimenting with containers and the Red Hat container ecosystem in general.

In this blogpost we will cover deploying applications using the OpenShift Enterprise PaaS that comes with the CDK. The whole process will be driven via the OpenShift CLI, in contrast to our last post which focused on OpenShift’s web interface. If you haven’t yet installed the CDK, check out the previous blog post for instructions.

By the end of this article you will know how to build existing applications on OpenShift, whether they already use

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Getting Started with the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK)

Docker containers are used to package software applications into portable, isolated stores. Developing software with containers helps developers create applications that will run the same way on every platform. However modern microservice deployments typically use a scheduler such as Kubernetes to run in production. In order to fully simulate the production environment, developers require a local version of production tools. In the Red Hat stack, this is supplied by the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK).

The Red Hat CDK is a customized virtual machine that makes it easy to run complex deployments resembling production. This means complex applications can be developed using production grade tools from the very start

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Container Tidbits: Can Good Supply Chain Hygiene Mitigate Base Image Sizes?

With Docker moving all of their official images to Alpine, base image size is a hot topic.  Sure, having sane and minimal base images is important, but software supply chain hygiene is equally (if not more) important – interested to understand why?

Among other things, it’s important in a production container environment to have provenance (i.e. knowledge of where your container images came from). Using

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