Select Your Destiny Friday

From news on the latest Red Hat product releases to essays on the hottest technologies – all authored by some of Red Hat’s best and brightest – the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Blog has been working to surface the information you need.  As we worked our way towards two years of posting goodness – we’ve covered everything from kpatch to containers.

That said, we have yet to ask you, our loyal readership, what you want to hear next.  So… for a change of pace, we’re asking you to “select your destiny”.  How does one go about “selecting their destiny”?  The answer is simple: by taking part in this straw poll.

We look forward to your selection!

Architecting Containers Part 2: Why the User Space Matters

In Architecting Containers Part 1 we explored the difference between user space and kernel space. In this post, we will continue by exploring why the user space matters to developers, administrators, and architects. From a functional perspective, we will explore the connection that both ISV applications and in-house application development have to the user space.

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What is Deep Container Inspection (DCI) and Why is it Important?

The format of container images is at the center of industry attention because it is so important to the adoption of containers.  With the advent of the Open Container Initiative (OCI), it seems appropriate to compare container images to network protocols.  Before TCP/IP became the defacto standard network protocol stack, each vendor was left to devise their own.  Some leveraged IPX/SPX, while others standardized on AppleTalk.  This made it difficult to create robust tooling.  Much like network protocols, standardizing the bit level format of a container image, allows the industry to focus on higher level business problems, and more importantly, their respective solutions.

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Now Available: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 Beta

In March, we announced the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.1, the first update to our Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 platform.  In addition, we also announced the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host, our first container-optimized host platform. Today, we are pleased to announce the beta availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 beta includes a number of new features and enhancements – while continuing to provide the stability, reliability, and security required to meet the demands of both modern datacenters and next-generation IT environments.

Interested in learning more?  For more information on the beta release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 you can review the release notes in the Red Hat Customer Portal.

Ready to get started?  If you’re an existing Red Hat customer (with an active Red Hat Enterprise Linux subscription), you can access and download Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 beta via the Software & Download Center.

The History of Containers

Given the recent massive spike in interest in Linux Containers, you could be forgiven for wondering, “Why now?”. It has been argued that the increasingly prevalent cloud computing model more closely resembles hosting providers than traditional enterprise IT, and that containers are a perfect match for this model.

Despite the sudden ubiquity of container technology, like so much in the world of open source software, containerization depends on a long series of previous innovations, especially in the operating system. “One cannot resist an idea whose time has come.” Containers are such an idea, one that has been a long time coming.

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See You at ContainerCon in Seattle

If you’re looking at running Linux containers, you should be heading to ContainerCon in Seattle next week. Co-located with LinuxCon and CloudOpen, ContainerCon is where leading contributors in Linux containers, the Linux kernel, and related projects will get together to educate the community on containers and related innovations.

Red Hatters are contributing to over 40 seContainerConssions on this year’s agenda, including a keynote from Red Hat VP of Engineering Matt Hicks. In “Revolutionizing Application Delivery with Linux and Containers,” Matt will focus on how Linux containers are changing the way that companies develop, consume and manage applications and will emphasize how open source communities and projects like Docker and Kubernetes are delivering this next wave of enterprise application architecture.

If you’re attending ContainerCon, check out Matt’s keynote and some of the sessions below:

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What’s Next for Containers? User Namespaces

What are user namespaces? Sticking with the apartment complex analogy, the numbering of users and groups have historically been the same in every container and in the underlying host, just like public channel 10 is generally the same in every unit in an apartment building.

But, imagine that people in different apartments are getting their television signal from different cable and satellite companies. Channel 10 is now different for for each person. It might be sports for one person, and news for another.

Historically, in the Linux kernel, there was a single data structure which held users and groups. Starting in kernel version 3.8

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Stop Gambling with Upgrades, Murphy’s Law Always Wins

It Started with Developers

Developers were the first adopters of containers for application creation. Now that containers have made their way into production environments, operations teams are starting to look deeper at what benefit they bring. Deployments are a key focus not just because the container model is so different, but also because there are automation integration points that have been previously unavailable.

Release engineers are faced with a tough question: continue to do rolling style updates as they always have or move to a red/black deployment model. Both have their pros and cons but using containers with red/black deployment methods provides

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rkt, appc, and Docker: A Take on the Linux Container Upstream

At this week’s CoreOS Fest in San Francisco, CoreOS is – unsurprisingly – pushing hard on the Application Container Spec (appc) and its first implementation, rkt, making it the topic of the first session after the keynote and a bold story about broad adoption.

When making technology decisions, Red Hat continuously evaluates all available options with the goal of selecting the best technologies that are supported by upstream communities. This is why Red Hat is engaging upstream in appc to actively contribute to the specification.

Red Hat engages in many upstream communities.  However, this engagement should not imply full support, or that we consider appc or rkt ready for

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