In Defense of the Pet Container, Part 2: Wrappers, Aggregates and Models… Oh My!

In our first post defending the pet container, we looked at the challenge of complexity facing modern software stacks and one way that containers address this challenge through aggregation. In essence, the Docker “wrapper” consolidates the next level of the stack, much like RPM did at the component level, but aggregation is just the beginning of what the project provides.

If we take a step back and look at the Docker project in context, there are four aspects that contribute to its exceptional popularity:

  1. it simplifies the way users interact with the kernel, for features we have come to call Linux containers;
  2. it’s a tool and format for aggregate packaging of software stacks to be deployed into containers;
  3. it is a model for layering generations of changes on top of each other in a single inheritance model;
  4. it adds a transport for these aggregate packages.

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What’s New in Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host 7.2.5


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It’s been a busy few weeks for us on the Atomic Host team, and we’re excited to announce the release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host 7.2.5! This is a big one too. For those not familiar with our release cadence, we release a new version of Atomic Host every six weeks. This enables us to balance the reliability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux with exciting new features and capabilities from our Project Atomic upstream community in a production ready, supportable manor.

 

Now, let’s walk through some key new features in Atomic Host:

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.NET Core on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

In November 2015, I blogged about the announcement to bring .NET to RHEL from the .NET Core upstream project to enterprise customers and developers, both as an RPM and as a Linux container.  That was quite a moment for the industry and, quite frankly, for me as well, having participated in the discussions that led to the significant announcement with Microsoft.  Since then, we have been in tight collaboration to make sure this day would actually arrive.  Despite the usual challenges with a relatively new open source project, the project was

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Red Hat at DockerCon 16 in Seattle

If you’re heading to DockerCon 16 next week in Seattle, connect with us to see why Fortune 500 organizations trust Red Hat for enterprise deployments. Red Hat subject matter experts will be onsite to walk you through real-world use cases for securely developing, deploying and managing container-based applications. 

Attend the State of Container Security Session

Join two of Red Hat’s Docker contributors discussing the state of container security today. Senior Software Engineer Mrunal Patel and Thomas Cameron, Global Evangelist of Emerging Technology are presenting on how you can secure your containerized microservices without slowing down development.

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In Defense of the Pet Container, Part 1: Prelude – The Only Constant is Complexity

It’s been just over three years since Solomon Hykes presented the world with the (so far) most creative way to use the tar command: the Docker project. Not only does the project combine existing container-technologies and make them easier to use, but its well-timed introduction drove an unprecedented rate of adoption for new technology.

Did people run containers before the Docker project? Yes, but it was harder to do so. The broader community was favoring LXC, and Red Hat was working on a libvirt-based model for Red Hat Enterprise Linux. With OpenShift 2, Red Hat had already been running containers in production for several years – both in an online PaaS as well as on-premise for enterprise customers. The model pre-Docker however was fundamentally different from what we are seeing today: rather than enabling completely independent runtimes inside the containers, the approach in

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Cloud Solutions Made Simple

The recent release of Red Hat Cloud Suite marked a new milestone for Red Hat and our customers.  First, it is the first in what will become a family of suites. Second, it enables enterprise IT to transform their application development and operations toward an agile, innovation center based on hybrid cloud and devops technologies.  Curating a broad set of open source technologies, Red Hat Cloud Suite offers a turnkey Cloud solution with a container-based app-development platform, private-cloud infrastructure, and a common management framework.  Specifically, Red Hat Cloud Suite includes

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Architecting Containers Part 5: Building a Secure and Manageable Container Software Supply Chain

Background

In Architecting Containers Part 4: Workload Characteristics and Candidates for Containerization we investigated the level of effort necessary to containerize different types of workloads. In this article I am going to address several challenges facing organizations that are deploying containers – how to patch containers and how to determine which teams are responsible for the container images. Should they be controlled by development or operations?

In addition, we are going to take a look at

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Architecting Containers Part 4: Workload Characteristics and Candidates for Containerization

Many development and operations teams are looking for guidelines to help them determine what applications can be containerized and how difficult it may be. In Architecting Containers Part 3: How the User Space Affects Your Applications we took an in depth look at how the user space affects applications for both developers and operations. In this article we are going to take a look at workload characteristics and the level of effort required to containerize different types of applications.

The goal of this article is to provide guidance based on current capabilities and best practices within

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Continuous Delivery / Deployment with OpenShift Enterprise

In our previous posts, we’ve explored the Red Hat container ecosystem, the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK), OpenShift as a local deployment and OpenShift in production. In this final post of the series, we’re going to take a look at how a team can take advantage of the advanced features of OpenShift in order to automatically move new versions of applications from development to production — a process known as Continuous Delivery (or Continuous Deployment, depending on the level of automation).

OpenShift supports

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OpenShift Enterprise in Production

In a previous blog post we took a look at the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) and how it can be used to build and deploy applications within a development environment that closely mimics a production OpenShift cluster. In this post, we’ll take an in-depth look at what a production OpenShift cluster looks like — the individual components, their functions, and how they relate to each other. We’ll also check out how OpenShift supports scaling up and scaling out applications in a production environment.

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