What’s New in Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host 7.4?

We’re pleased to announce that Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host 7.4 is now generally available. Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host is a lightweight, container-optimized version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host couples the flexible, modular capabilities of Linux containers with the reliability and security of Red Hat Enterprise Linux in a reduced footprint, to decrease the attack surface and provide only the packages needed to light up hardware and run containers. Here’s a look at some of the major changes in 7.4.

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Signed Images from the Red Hat Container Catalog

As a follow-up to my introduction of simple signing, I’m excited to announce that Red Hat is now serving signatures for Red Hat Container Catalog Images!

In May, Red Hat announced the Container Health Index, providing an aggregate safety rating for container images in our public registry. As part of our commitment to delivering trusted content, we are now serving signed images. This means that customers can now configure a Red Hat Enterprise Linux host to cryptographically verify that images have come from Red Hat when they are pulled onto the system. This is a significant step in advancing the security of container hosts, providing assurance of provenance and integrity and enabling non-repudiation. Non-repudiation simply means that the signer cannot deny their signature—a key security principle for digital transactions.

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Introducing the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Base Image

We’re excited to announce our latest step in the further optimizing of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) for containers with the release of the RHEL Atomic base image. This image is much smaller than the current RHEL base image, giving just enough to get started on building your application or service.

We carved out python, systemd, and yes, even Yum is gone – leaving you with only the bare bone essentials like glibc, rpm, bash, and their remaining dependencies. This leaves us with an image that’s just under 30MB compressed, 75MB on disk; composed of 81 packages.

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Announcing Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host 7.2.6

Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host is a small footprint, purpose-built version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux that is designed to run containerized workloads. Building on the success of our last release, Red Hat’s Atomic-OpenShift team is excited to announce the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host 7.2.6. This release features improvements in rpm-ostree, cockpit, skopeo, docker, and the atomic CLI. The full release notes can be found here. This post is going to explore a major new feature

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What’s New in Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host 7.2.5


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It’s been a busy few weeks for us on the Atomic Host team, and we’re excited to announce the release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host 7.2.5! This is a big one too. For those not familiar with our release cadence, we release a new version of Atomic Host every six weeks. This enables us to balance the reliability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux with exciting new features and capabilities from our Project Atomic upstream community in a production ready, supportable manor.

 

Now, let’s walk through some key new features in Atomic Host:

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Red Hat at DockerCon 16 in Seattle

If you’re heading to DockerCon 16 next week in Seattle, connect with us to see why Fortune 500 organizations trust Red Hat for enterprise deployments. Red Hat subject matter experts will be onsite to walk you through real-world use cases for securely developing, deploying and managing container-based applications. 

Attend the State of Container Security Session

Join two of Red Hat’s Docker contributors discussing the state of container security today. Senior Software Engineer Mrunal Patel and Thomas Cameron, Global Evangelist of Emerging Technology are presenting on how you can secure your containerized microservices without slowing down development.

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In Defense of the Pet Container, Part 1: Prelude – The Only Constant is Complexity

It’s been just over three years since Solomon Hykes presented the world with the (so far) most creative way to use the tar command: the Docker project. Not only does the project combine existing container-technologies and make them easier to use, but its well-timed introduction drove an unprecedented rate of adoption for new technology.

Did people run containers before the Docker project? Yes, but it was harder to do so. The broader community was favoring LXC, and Red Hat was working on a libvirt-based model for Red Hat Enterprise Linux. With OpenShift 2, Red Hat had already been running containers in production for several years – both in an online PaaS as well as on-premise for enterprise customers. The model pre-Docker however was fundamentally different from what we are seeing today: rather than enabling completely independent runtimes inside the containers, the approach in

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The Red Hat Ecosystem for Microservice and Container Development

Over the last couple years, microservices and containers have started to redefine the software development landscape. The traditional large Java or C# application has been replaced with multiple smaller components (microservices) which coordinate to provide the required functionality. These microservices typically run inside containers, which provide isolation and portability.

This approach has numerous benefits including being able to scale and replace microservices independently as well as reducing the complexity of individual components. However, it also brings more complexity to the system level; it takes extra effort and tooling to manage and orchestrate the microservices and their interactions.

This post will describe how Red Hat technology and services can be used to develop, deploy and run an effective microservice-based system.

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27-JAN Webcast: Using the Atomic Registry for Secure Container Image Management

Icon_RH_Hardware_Monitor-Webinar_RGB_ShinyWhen working with container-based applications, admins and developers need a place to store and share container images, a way to deploy them, as well as a way to monitor and administer them once they’re deployed. Join Red Hat software engineers Aaron Weitekamp and Stef Walter for this webcast, Using the Atomic Registry for Secure Container Image Management, on January 27th at 11:00 ET, to gain a better understanding of sharing, deploying, and managing container images.

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