Ops Happiness – Harness Data for Operations Intelligence

As covered in the previous article, The Quest for Operations Intelligence, we have very high expectations from any modern Cloud architecture applications deployed on Red Hat hybrid cloud solutions.

No matter how much support is put into place, the customer needs to be able to operate their hybrid clouds.

After taking a look a correlating all of the available data we reached a conclusion in the previous article that we needed to do something more

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Red Hat IT Single Sign On(SSO) Runs on Red Hat Virtualization

Red Hat is best known for Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and for being a leader in driving open source development projects. In many cases, the upstream projects then become Red Hat products that provide enterprise functionality elsewhere in the stack.

In a previous blog post, I detailed how we use Red Hat Single Sign On (SSO) to provide a robust and scalable authentication system for public web properties. Applications, such a Red Hat SSO, can obviously be deployed in a variety of platforms. Red Hat IT selected to adopt a hybrid-cloud deployment model for Red Hat SSO, as the majority of normal traffic for https://sso.redhat.com is serviced out of one of our corporate data centers. SSO and virtually every other application runs on top of Red Hat Virtualization.

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Red Hat Enterprise Linux Across Architectures: Everything Works Out of the Box

Since the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server for ARM Development Preview 7.3 became available I’ve been wanting to try it out to see how the existing code for x86_64 systems works on the 64-bit ARM architecture (a.k.a. aarch64).

Going in, I was a bit apprehensive that some kind of heavy lifting would be needed to get things working on the ARM platform. My experience with cross-architecture ports with other distros (before I joined Red Hat) indicated

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Identity Management Improvements in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3: Part 1

Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7.3 has been out for a bit, but have you looked at what we’ve added in the Identity Management area for this release? I’m excited to say, we’ve added quite a bit!

In the past I have been talking about individual features in Identity Management (IdM) and System Security Services Daemon (SSSD) but this is really not how we prioritize our efforts nowadays. We look at customer requests, community efforts, and market trends and then define themes for the release. So what were these themes for RHEL 7.3?

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PCI Series: Requirement 10 – Track and Monitor All Access to Network Resources and Cardholder Data

This is my last post dedicated to the use of Identity Management (IdM) and related technologies to address the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS). This specific post is related to requirement ten (i.e. the requirement to track and monitor all access to network resources and cardholder data). The outline and mapping of individual articles to the requirements can be found in the overarching post that started the series.

Requirement ten focuses on audit and monitoring. Many components of an IdM-based solution, including client components like

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SELinux Mitigates container Vulnerability

A new CVE, (CVE-2016-9962), for the docker container runtime and runc were recently released. Fixed packages are being prepared and shipped for RHEL as well as Fedora and CentOS. This CVE reports that if you execd into a running container, the processes inside of the container could attack the process that just entered the container.

If this process had open file descriptors, the processes inside of the container could ptrace the new process and gain access to those file descriptors and read/write them, even potentially get access to the host network, or execute commands on the host.

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Container Live Migration Using runC and CRIU

In my previous article I wrote about how it was possible to move from checkpoint/restore to container migration with CRIU. This time I want to write about how to actually migrate a running container from one system to another. In this article I will migrate a runC based container using runC’s built-in CRIU support to checkpoint and restore a container on different hosts.

I have two virtual machines (rhel01 and rhel02) which are hosting my container. My container is running Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 and is located on a shared NFS, which both of my virtual machines have mounted. In addition, I am telling runC to mount the container

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Digital Foundations – Challenges CIOs Must Embrace

When building anything substantial, such as a house or bridge, you start by laying down a solid foundation. Nothing changes this aspect of building brick by brick when you move from traditional constructions to application development and architecting your supporting infrastructure. Throw in Cloud terminology and you might think that the principles of a solid foundation are a bit flighty, but nothing is further from the truth.

When looking to manage an organization’s journey into their digital future, CIOs are dealing with a lot of challenges. Challenges that they face on the road to digital transformation can be daunting as first glance, but must be embraced to properly navigate the road to success.

Digital Foundations

Let’s take a look in this first article at the challenges CIOs must embrace before diving into how to

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PCI Series: Requirement 8 – Identify and Authenticate Access to System Components

This post continues my series dedicated to the use of Identity Management (IdM) and related technologies to address the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS).  This specific post is related to requirement eight (i.e. the requirement to identify and authenticate access to system components). The outline and mapping of individual articles to requirements can be found in the overarching post that started the series.

Requirement eight is directly related to IdM. IdM can be used to address most of the requirements in this section. IdM stores user accounts, provides user account life-cycle management

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Container Tidbits: Adding Capabilities to a Container

A few weeks ago, I wrote a blog on removing capabilities from a container. But what if you want to add capabilities?

While I recommend that people remove capabilities, in certain situations users need to add capabilities in order to get their container to run.

One example is when you have a app that needs a single capability, like an Network Time Protocol (NTP) daemon container that resets the system time on a machine. So if you wanted to run a container for an ntp daemon, you would need to do a --cap-add SYS_TIME. Sadly, many users don’t think this through, or understand what it means to add a capability.

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