Stop Gambling with Upgrades, Murphy’s Law Always Wins

It Started with Developers

Developers were the first adopters of containers for application creation. Now that containers have made their way into production environments, operations teams are starting to look deeper at what benefit they bring. Deployments are a key focus not just because the container model is so different, but also because there are automation integration points that have been previously unavailable.

Release engineers are faced with a tough question: continue to do rolling style updates as they always have or move to a red/black deployment model. Both have their pros and cons but using containers with red/black deployment methods provides

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How Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host Powers OpenShift Online

The OpenShift Online Technical Operations team was looking forward to the beta availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host. In fact, they participated in early sprints as part of the Atomic Special Interest Group (SIG) to help make sure Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host had the operational “beef” to stand high alongside Red Hat’s other enterprise products. Part of this process led to us running the unreleased bits in OpenShift Online prior to the beta announcement.

That said, we’re not using it to run some corner niche of our infrastructure. Instead, we are using the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host + Docker combo to run our reverse proxy tier. This means that every API, www.openshift.com, and web console request made to OpenShift Online runs through this tier.

So why all the interest? The small size of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host is the

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