Continuous Delivery / Deployment with OpenShift Enterprise

In our previous posts, we’ve explored the Red Hat container ecosystem, the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK), OpenShift as a local deployment and OpenShift in production. In this final post of the series, we’re going to take a look at how a team can take advantage of the advanced features of OpenShift in order to automatically move new versions of applications from development to production — a process known as Continuous Delivery (or Continuous Deployment, depending on the level of automation).

OpenShift supports

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OpenShift Enterprise in Production

In a previous blog post we took a look at the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) and how it can be used to build and deploy applications within a development environment that closely mimics a production OpenShift cluster. In this post, we’ll take an in-depth look at what a production OpenShift cluster looks like — the individual components, their functions, and how they relate to each other. We’ll also check out how OpenShift supports scaling up and scaling out applications in a production environment.

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Test Driving OpenShift with the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK)

Setting up a local development environment that corresponds as close as possible to production can be a time-consuming and error-prone task. However, for OpenShift deployments, we have the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) which does a good job at solving this and also provides a great environment for experimenting with containers and the Red Hat container ecosystem in general.

In this blogpost we will cover deploying applications using the OpenShift Enterprise PaaS that comes with the CDK. The whole process will be driven via the OpenShift CLI, in contrast to our last post which focused on OpenShift’s web interface. If you haven’t yet installed the CDK, check out the previous blog post for instructions.

By the end of this article you will know how to build existing applications on OpenShift, whether they already use

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Getting Started with the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK)

Docker containers are used to package software applications into portable, isolated stores. Developing software with containers helps developers create applications that will run the same way on every platform. However modern microservice deployments typically use a scheduler such as Kubernetes to run in production. In order to fully simulate the production environment, developers require a local version of production tools. In the Red Hat stack, this is supplied by the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK).

The Red Hat CDK is a customized virtual machine that makes it easy to run complex deployments resembling production. This means complex applications can be developed using production grade tools from the very start

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The Red Hat Ecosystem for Microservice and Container Development

Over the last couple years, microservices and containers have started to redefine the software development landscape. The traditional large Java or C# application has been replaced with multiple smaller components (microservices) which coordinate to provide the required functionality. These microservices typically run inside containers, which provide isolation and portability.

This approach has numerous benefits including being able to scale and replace microservices independently as well as reducing the complexity of individual components. However, it also brings more complexity to the system level; it takes extra effort and tooling to manage and orchestrate the microservices and their interactions.

This post will describe how Red Hat technology and services can be used to develop, deploy and run an effective microservice-based system.

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