PCI Series: Requirement 2 – Do Not Use Vendor-Supplied Defaults for System Passwords and Other Security Parameters

This article is third in a series dedicated to the use of Identity Management (IdM) and related technologies to address the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS). This specific post covers the PCI DSS requirement related to not using vendor-supplied defaults for system passwords and other security parameters. The outline and mapping of individual articles to the requirements can be found in the overarching post that started the series.

The second section of the PCI-DSS standard applies to defaults – especially passwords and other security parameters. The standard calls for the reset of passwords (etc.) for any new system before placing it on the network. IdM can help here. Leveraging IdM for centralized accounts and policy information allows for a simple automated provisioning of new systems with

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In Defense of the Pet Container, Part 3: Puppies, Kittens and… Containers

In our third and final installment (see: part one & part two), let’s take a look at some high-level use cases for Linux containers as well as finally (finally) defending what I like to call “pet” containers. From a general perspective, we see three repeated high-level use cases for containerizing applications:

  1. The fully orchestrated, multi-container application as you would create in OpenShift via the Red Hat Container Development Kit;
  2. Loosely orchestrated containers that don’t use advanced features like application templates and Kubernetes; and
  3. Pet containers.

Continue reading “In Defense of the Pet Container, Part 3: Puppies, Kittens and… Containers”

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