Pushing the Limits of Kernel Networking

Note: The following post was authored by Alexander Duyck before leaving Red Hat earlier this month.  While Alex will be missed, his work continues in the capable hands of the Networking Services team.  To this end, I encourage you to “read on” and learn more about how we’ve turned up the heat on kernel networking with the beta release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2.


Over the last year I have been working at Red Hat as a part of the Linux Kernel Networking Services Team focused on improving the performance of the kernel networking data path.  Prior to working at Red Hat I had worked at Intel as a driver maintainer for their server drivers including ixgbe.  This has put me in a unique position to be able to provide tuning advice for both the network stack and the Intel device drivers.  Last month, at LinuxCon North America, I gave a presentation that summarizes most of the work that has been done to improve network performance in the last year, and the performance gains as seen by comparing Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.1 versus an early (alpha) release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2.  The following is a recap of what I covered.

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Select Your Destiny Friday

From news on the latest Red Hat product releases to essays on the hottest technologies – all authored by some of Red Hat’s best and brightest – the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Blog has been working to surface the information you need.  As we worked our way towards two years of posting goodness – we’ve covered everything from kpatch to containers.

That said, we have yet to ask you, our loyal readership, what you want to hear next.  So… for a change of pace, we’re asking you to “select your destiny”.  How does one go about “selecting their destiny”?  The answer is simple: by taking part in this straw poll.

We look forward to your selection!

Architecting Containers Part 2: Why the User Space Matters

In Architecting Containers Part 1 we explored the difference between user space and kernel space. In this post, we will continue by exploring why the user space matters to developers, administrators, and architects. From a functional perspective, we will explore the connection that both ISV applications and in-house application development have to the user space.

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Red Hat Certificate System 9 Now Available

We are pleased to announce the release of Red Hat Certificate System 9.  Supported on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.1 and based on the open source PKI capabilities of the Dogtag Certificate System, Red Hat Certificate System 9 provides a robust and flexible set of features to support Certificate Life Cycle Management.  It is able to issue, renew, suspend, revoke, archive/recover, and manage the single and dual-key X.509v3 certificates needed to handle strong authentication, single sign-on, and secure communications.  Red Hat Certificate System 9 incorporates several new and enhanced features, including

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What is Deep Container Inspection (DCI) and Why is it Important?

The format of container images is at the center of industry attention because it is so important to the adoption of containers.  With the advent of the Open Container Initiative (OCI), it seems appropriate to compare container images to network protocols.  Before TCP/IP became the defacto standard network protocol stack, each vendor was left to devise their own.  Some leveraged IPX/SPX, while others standardized on AppleTalk.  This made it difficult to create robust tooling.  Much like network protocols, standardizing the bit level format of a container image, allows the industry to focus on higher level business problems, and more importantly, their respective solutions.

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Now Available: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 Beta

In March, we announced the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.1, the first update to our Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 platform.  In addition, we also announced the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host, our first container-optimized host platform. Today, we are pleased to announce the beta availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 beta includes a number of new features and enhancements – while continuing to provide the stability, reliability, and security required to meet the demands of both modern datacenters and next-generation IT environments.

Interested in learning more?  For more information on the beta release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 you can review the release notes in the Red Hat Customer Portal.

Ready to get started?  If you’re an existing Red Hat customer (with an active Red Hat Enterprise Linux subscription), you can access and download Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 beta via the Software & Download Center.