Enterprise-Ready Container Orchestration with Kubernetes

Here on the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Blog we’ve dedicated a number of posts to containers and a variety of associated Red Hat solutions.  Whether you’re seeking to deploy Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 applications on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 as containers, hoping to better understand how atomic updates work, or are simply out to learn all you can about Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host – there’s likely a post (here) with the information you need.  However, we’ve yet to really explore container orchestration.  To this end, I invite you to read this new post from Red Hat’s own Joe Fernandes.  Joe talks about Kubernetes, Google’s tool for managing clusters of Linux containers, its progenitor (i.e Google’s Borg), and how Red Hat is building on top of Kubernetes to bring web-scale container infrastructure to enterprise customers.

Understanding the Changes to ‘docker search’ and ‘docker pull’ in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.1

If you’re working with container images on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.1 or Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host, you might have noticed that the search and pull behavior of the included docker tool works slightly differently than it does if you’re working with that of the upstream project. This is intentional.

When we started the planning process for containers in RHEL 7.1, we had 3 goals in mind:

  1. Give control over the search path to the end-user administrator
  2. Enable a federated approach to search and discovery of docker-formatted container images
  3. Support the ability for Red Hat customers to consume container images and other content included as part of their Red Hat Subscription

The changes we implemented, which are documented on the Red Hat Customer Portal, affect three different areas of the tool:

Continue reading “Understanding the Changes to ‘docker search’ and ‘docker pull’ in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.1”

Forrester’s Dave Bartoletti Reports on Container Usage at Red Hat Partner Conference

20150408_110418Yesterday, at Red Hat’s annual North America Partner Conference (in Orlando, FL), Dave Bartoletti, principal analyst with Forrester Research, told hundreds of attendees about a recently completed market research program undertaken by Forrester and sponsored by Red Hat. In this study, 194 developers and IT decision-makers at mid- to large-size companies were surveyed as to their plans and expectations for container technologies.

What they shared, indicates that

Continue reading “Forrester’s Dave Bartoletti Reports on Container Usage at Red Hat Partner Conference”

SSSD vs Winbind

In a previous post, I compared the features and capabilities of Samba winbind and SSSD. In this post, I will focus on formulating a set of criteria for how to choose between SSSD and winbind. In general, my recommendation is to choose SSSD… but there are some notable exceptions.

Continue reading “SSSD vs Winbind”

Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host: Updates Made Easy

Earlier in March we announced the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Atomic Host, a small footprint, container host based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. It provides a stable host platform, optimized for running application containers, and brings a number of application software packaging and deployment benefits to customers. In my previous container blog I gave the top seven reasons to deploy Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Atomic Host. One reason was the ability to do atomic updates and rollbacks. In this blog I provide an in-depth look into atomic updating and how it differs from a yum update. And, speaking of atomic updates

Continue reading “Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host: Updates Made Easy”