PCI Series: Requirement 6 – Develop and Maintain Secure Systems and Applications

This post is the fifth installment in my PCI DSS series – a series dedicated to the use of Identity Management (IdM) and related technologies to address the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS). This specific post is related to requirement six (i.e. the requirement to develop and maintain secure systems and applications). The outline and mapping of individual articles to requirements can be found in the overarching post that started the series.

Section six of the PCI DSS standard covers guidelines related to secure application development and testing. IdM and its ecosystem can help in multiple ways to address requirements in this part of the PCI-DSS standard. First of all, IdM includes a set of Apache modules for

Red Hat Keeps the Lights on with Red Hat Virtualization

Red Hat has been a technology industry leader for many years. We are not just creators of innovative open source technologies, but we are also consumers of our own technologies. At Red Hat, nearly all of our core IT infrastructure runs on Red Hat Virtualization. From our development environment all the way to production. Several of our mission critical applications are powered by Red Hat Virtualization including our email systems, identity management, subscription manager, customer service portal, and many more applications. Since we are a global company, we have deployed thousands of VMs that need to be up and running 24/7, and we chose Red Hat Virtualization to get the job done.

Integrating Red Hat Virtualization and Red Hat OpenStack Platform with Neutron Networking

As applications are designed, redesigned, or even simply thought about at a high level, we frequently think about technical barriers along side business needs. Business needs may dictate that a new architecture move forward, but technical limitations can sometimes counter how far forward – unless there is something to bridge the gap. The new Neutron network integration between Red Hat Virtualization (RHV) and Red Hat OpenStack Platform (RHOSP) provides such a bridge for business and technical solutions.

Upgrade Your Red Hat Virtualization Environment with a Simple Tool

This past August, Red Hat announced the availability of Red Hat Virtualization 4.0, the latest virtualization release that aims to help IT organizations modernize their infrastructure, enhance their virtualization management and automation, and deploy advanced networking functionality. As a Software Engineer, I know that releases are exciting and early adopter customers eagerly await for the opportunity to deploy the latest features. However, the the upgrade process has not always been seamless. Through my work with the Customer Support Team, we have been exploring tools to streamline and simplify the upgrade process.

Your Cloud Installed Before Lunch with QuickStart Cloud Installer 1.0

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Figure 1. Inside QuickStart Cloud Installer.

What if I told you that you can have your Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) based Cloud infrastructure, with Red Hat Virtualization, OpenStack, OpenShift and CloudForms all setup before you have to stop for lunch?

Would you be surprised?

Could you do that today?

In most cases I am betting your answer would be not possible, not even on your best day. Not to worry, the solution is here and it’s called the QuickStart Cloud Installer (QCI).

Today Red Hat announced the general availability of

PCI Series: Requirement 3 – Protect Stored Cardholder Data

Welcome to another post dedicated to the use of Identity Management (IdM) and related technologies in addressing the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS). This specific post is related to requirement three (i.e. the requirement to protect stored cardholder data). In case you’re new to the series – the outline and mapping of individual articles to the requirements can be found in the overarching post that started the series.

Section three of the PCI DSS standard talks about storing cardholder data in a secure way. One of the technologies that can be used for secure storage of cardholder data is

PCI Series: Requirement 2 – Do Not Use Vendor-Supplied Defaults for System Passwords and Other Security Parameters

This article is third in a series dedicated to the use of Identity Management (IdM) and related technologies to address the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS). This specific post covers the PCI DSS requirement related to not using vendor-supplied defaults for system passwords and other security parameters. The outline and mapping of individual articles to the requirements can be found in the overarching post that started the series.

The second section of the PCI-DSS standard applies to defaults – especially passwords and other security parameters. The standard calls for the reset of passwords (etc.) for any new system before placing it on the network. IdM can help here. Leveraging IdM for centralized accounts and policy information allows for a simple automated provisioning of new systems with