Getting the Best of Both Worlds with Queue Splitting (Bifurcated Driver)

The Linux networking stack has many features that are essential for IoT (Internet of Things) and data center networking, such as filtering, connection tracking, memory management, VLANs, overlay, and process isolation. These features come with a small overhead of latency and throughput for tiny packets at line rate.

DPDK (Data Plane Development Kit) allows access to the hardware directly from applications, bypassing the Linux networking stack. This reduces latency and allows more packets to be processed. However, many features that Linux provides are not available with DPDK.

What if there was a way to have ultra low latency and high throughput for some traffic, and full feature-set from Linux networking, all at the same time? This “utopia” is now possible with Queue Splitting (Bifurcated Driver).


Pushing the Limits of Kernel Networking

Note: The following post was authored by Alexander Duyck before leaving Red Hat earlier this month.  While Alex will be missed, his work continues in the capable hands of the Networking Services team.  To this end, I encourage you to “read on” and learn more about how we’ve turned up the heat on kernel networking with the beta release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2.

Over the last year I have been working at Red Hat as a part of the Linux Kernel Networking Services Team focused on improving the performance of the kernel networking data path.  Prior to working at Red Hat I had worked at Intel as a driver maintainer for their server drivers including ixgbe.  This has put me in a unique position to be able to provide tuning advice for both the network stack and the Intel device drivers.  Last month, at LinuxCon North America, I gave a presentation that summarizes most of the work that has been done to improve network performance in the last year, and the performance gains as seen by comparing Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.1 versus an early (alpha) release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2.  The following is a recap of what I covered. (more…)

Recent Updates to the Atomic CLI

Back in April, we provided an in-depth look into atomic updating bash-161382_640and announced the first of many atomic updates. Since then, Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host has continued to evolve, along with the asynchronous kernel errata. What’s changed in the last few months? Let’s take a look. (more…)

Select Your Destiny Friday

From news on the latest Red Hat product releases to essays on the hottest technologies – all authored by some of Red Hat’s best and brightest – the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Blog has been working to surface the information you need.  As we worked our way towards two years of posting goodness – we’ve covered everything from kpatch to containers.

That said, we have yet to ask you, our loyal readership, what you want to hear next.  So… for a change of pace, we’re asking you to “select your destiny”.  How does one go about “selecting their destiny”?  The answer is simple: by taking part in this straw poll.

We look forward to your selection!

Architecting Containers Part 2: Why the User Space Matters

In Architecting Containers Part 1 we explored the difference between user space and kernel space. In this post, we will continue by exploring why the user space matters to developers, administrators, and architects. From a functional perspective, we will explore the connection that both ISV applications and in-house application development have to the user space. (more…)

Red Hat Certificate System 9 Now Available

We are pleased to announce the release of Red Hat Certificate System 9.  Supported on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.1 and based on the open source PKI capabilities of the Dogtag Certificate System, Red Hat Certificate System 9 provides a robust and flexible set of features to support Certificate Life Cycle Management.  It is able to issue, renew, suspend, revoke, archive/recover, and manage the single and dual-key X.509v3 certificates needed to handle strong authentication, single sign-on, and secure communications.  Red Hat Certificate System 9 incorporates several new and enhanced features, including (more…)

What is Deep Container Inspection (DCI) and Why is it Important?

The format of container images is at the center of industry attention because it is so important to the adoption of containers.  With the advent of the Open Container Initiative (OCI), it seems appropriate to compare container images to network protocols.  Before TCP/IP became the defacto standard network protocol stack, each vendor was left to devise their own.  Some leveraged IPX/SPX, while others standardized on AppleTalk.  This made it difficult to create robust tooling.  Much like network protocols, standardizing the bit level format of a container image, allows the industry to focus on higher level business problems, and more importantly, their respective solutions. (more…)

Now Available: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 Beta

In March, we announced the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.1, the first update to our Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 platform.  In addition, we also announced the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host, our first container-optimized host platform. Today, we are pleased to announce the beta availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 beta includes a number of new features and enhancements – while continuing to provide the stability, reliability, and security required to meet the demands of both modern datacenters and next-generation IT environments.

Interested in learning more?  For more information on the beta release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 you can review the release notes in the Red Hat Customer Portal.

Ready to get started?  If you’re an existing Red Hat customer (with an active Red Hat Enterprise Linux subscription), you can access and download Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 beta via the Software & Download Center.

The History of Containers

Given the recent massive spike in interest in Linux Containers, you could be forgiven for wondering, “Why now?”. It has been argued that the increasingly prevalent cloud computing model more closely resembles hosting providers than traditional enterprise IT, and that containers are a perfect match for this model.

Despite the sudden ubiquity of container technology, like so much in the world of open source software, containerization depends on a long series of previous innovations, especially in the operating system. “One cannot resist an idea whose time has come.” Containers are such an idea, one that has been a long time coming. (more…)

See You at ContainerCon in Seattle

If you’re looking at running Linux containers, you should be heading to ContainerCon in Seattle next week. Co-located with LinuxCon and CloudOpen, ContainerCon is where leading contributors in Linux containers, the Linux kernel, and related projects will get together to educate the community on containers and related innovations.

Red Hatters are contributing to over 40 seContainerConssions on this year’s agenda, including a keynote from Red Hat VP of Engineering Matt Hicks. In “Revolutionizing Application Delivery with Linux and Containers,” Matt will focus on how Linux containers are changing the way that companies develop, consume and manage applications and will emphasize how open source communities and projects like Docker and Kubernetes are delivering this next wave of enterprise application architecture.

If you’re attending ContainerCon, check out Matt’s keynote and some of the sessions below: (more…)